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The Australian Directory of Human Animal Interaction Programs

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Abstract

Research confirms what most of us instinctively know to be true: the presence of animals in people's lives has a significant positive influence on the social, emotional and physical well-being of people.

Our companion animals can ease loneliness and calm the emotions; they can make us laugh and make us feel needed; and they can soothe us in times of illness or hardship. Many of our companion animals have been trained to provide mobility and independence for those in need. There is a very strong bond between humans and animals.

This relationship between humans and animals is referred to as Human-Animal Interaction (HAI).

There are many groups, small and large, formal and informal, that provide opportunities for enhancing HAI through their endeavours. As a result, the field of Human-Animal Interaction has grown considerably, due in no small part to the work of many of these groups in Australia.

The groups listed in this Directory play a special role in fostering our understanding of the human-animal bond.

That companion animals have a unique place in the human world is undeniable, as companion animals play an irreplaceable part in the enrichment of people's lives.

Submitter

Megan Kendall

Purdue University

URL http://www.humananimalinteraction.org.au/
Language English
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Tags
  1. Animal-assisted activities
  2. Animal-assisted therapies
  3. Animal roles
  4. Animals in culture
  5. Companion
  6. Human-animal interactions
  7. Mammals
  8. Pets and companion animals