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When wildlife tourism goes wrong: a case study of stakeholder and management issues regarding Dingoes on Fraser Island, Australia

By G. L. Burns, P. Howard

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Abstract

Images on brochures, web pages and postcards lead to an expectation by tourists and visitors that interaction with Dingoes (Canis lupus Dingo) will be part of their Fraser Island experience in Australia. However, as the number of tourists to the island increase, so do the reports of Dingo attacks. The first recorded death from such an attack on Fraser Island occurred in April 2001, and was immediately followed by a government-ordered cull of Dingoes. This paper explores issues surrounding both this decision and the management strategies implemented afterwards. Based on interviews with a variety of stakeholders between June and September 2001, many conflicting perspectives on human-wildlife interaction as a component of tourism are identified. The conclusion is drawn that while strategies for managing Dingoes are essential, if such attacks are a consequence of humans feeding wildlife and resultant wildlife habituation, then strategies for managing people are also necessary for this example of wildlife tourism to be both successful and sustainable.

Date 2003
Publication Title Tourism Management
Volume 24
Issue 6
Pages 699-712
ISBN/ISSN 0261-5177
DOI 10.1016/S0261-5177(03)00146-8
Language English
Author Address Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan 4111 QLD, Australia. leah.burns@griffith.edu.au
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Tags
  1. Animal welfare
  2. Australasia
  3. Australia
  4. Biological resources
  5. Canine
  6. Carnivores
  7. Case Report
  8. Commonwealth of Nations
  9. Constraints
  10. Developed countries
  11. Guests
  12. Mammals
  13. Oceania
  14. OECD countries
  15. peer-reviewed
  16. sustainability
  17. Tourism and travel
  18. visitors
  19. Wild animals
  20. wildlife management
Badges
  1. peer-reviewed