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You are here: Home / Journal Articles / A comparison of welfare outcomes for weaner and mature Bos indicus bulls surgically or tension band castrated with or without analgesia: 2. Responses related to stress, health and productivity / About

A comparison of welfare outcomes for weaner and mature Bos indicus bulls surgically or tension band castrated with or without analgesia: 2. Responses related to stress, health and productivity

By J. C. Petherick, A. H. Small, D. G. Mayer, I. G. Colditz, D. M. Ferguson, K. J. Stafford

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Abstract

Tension banding castration of cattle is gaining favour because it is relatively simple to perform and is promoted by retailers of the banders as a humane castration method. Two experiments were conducted, under tropical conditions using Bos indicus bulls comparing tension banding (Band) and surgical (Surgical) castration of weaner (7-10 months old) and mature (22-25 months old) bulls with and without pain management (NSAID (ketoprofen) or saline injected intramuscularly immediately prior to castration). Welfare outcomes were assessed using a range of measures; this paper reports on some physiological, morbidity and productivity-related responses to augment the behavioural responses reported in an accompanying paper. Blood samples were taken on the day of castration (day 0) at the time of restraint (0 min) and 30 min (weaners) or 40 min (mature bulls), 2 h, and 7 h; and days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 post-castration. Plasmas from day 0 were assayed for cortisol, creatine kinase, total protein and packed cell volume. Plasmas from the other samples were assayed for cortisol and haptoglobin (plus the 0 min sample). Liveweights were recorded approximately weekly to 6 weeks and at 2 and 3 months post-castration. Castration sites were checked at these same times to 2 months post-castration to score the extent of healing and presence of sepsis. Cortisol concentrations (means.e. nmol/L) were significantly ( P

Date 2014
Publication Title Applied Animal Behaviour Science
Volume 157
Pages 35-47
ISBN/ISSN 0168-1591
Publisher Elsevier
DOI 10.1016/j.applanim.2014.05.005
Author Address The University of Queensland, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, PO Box 6014, N. Rockhampton, QLD 4701, Australia.c.petherick@uq.edu.au carol.petherick@daff.qld.gov.au
Additional Language English
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Tags
  1. Age
  2. Analgesia
  3. Animal behavior
  4. Animal genetics
  5. Animal nutrition
  6. Animal physiology
  7. Animal reproduction
  8. Animals
  9. Animal welfare
  10. antiinflammatory agents
  11. Bacteria
  12. Behavior and behavior mechanisms
  13. Biochemistry
  14. Blood
  15. Bovidae
  16. Bulls
  17. Castration
  18. Cattle
  19. Creatine
  20. Diseases and injuries of animals
  21. Enzymes
  22. Healing
  23. Health
  24. Hydrocortisone
  25. Infections
  26. Inflammation
  27. Liveweight gains
  28. Mammals
  29. morbidity
  30. operations
  31. Pain
  32. performance traits
  33. productivity
  34. Reproduction
  35. responses
  36. restraint
  37. Ruminants
  38. sepsis
  39. surgery
  40. timing
  41. ungulates
  42. vertebrates
  43. Veterinary pharmacology
  44. Wounds and injuries