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You are here: Home / Presentations / Filthy Cellars and Healthy Pets: Relationships between Public Health, Pets and Veterinarians in Cincinnati Prior to World War I / About

Filthy Cellars and Healthy Pets: Relationships between Public Health, Pets and Veterinarians in Cincinnati Prior to World War I

By Kelly Wenig

Category Presentations
Abstract

In 1868, Board of Health officials in the city of Cincinnati declared that all animals had to be removed from the basements of city residences. In his report on the state of the city, health officer William C. Clendenin commented that “[t]he extent to which cellars are used throughout the city as depositories for rubbish and filth is truly surprising; --many respectable people [keep] geese, chickens, dogs, and even calves in their cellars…Filthy cellars, especially when they are very damp, are a very certain cause of sickness.”1 For most of the nineteenth century, cows, chickens, sheep, dogs and cats were allowed free reign of the city and were often kept in the back yards and basements of private citizens. What had changed? Why were animals now expelled from living in close quarters with their human companions?

Submitter

Katie Carroll

Date April 2009
Publisher Iowa State University
Conference Title Queen City Colloquium
URL http://works.bepress.com/kelly_wenig/1/
Language English
Tags
  1. Animal roles
  2. Animals in culture
  3. Animal welfare
  4. Health
  5. Homes
  6. Human-animal relationships
  7. Ohio
  8. Pets and companion animals
  9. Pets & People
  10. Physical environment
  11. Public health
  12. Veterinarians
  13. veterinary care