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You are here: Home / Journal Articles / Pinch-induced behavioural inhibition (clipthesia) as a restraint method for cats during veterinary examinations: preliminary results on cat susceptibility and welfare / About

Pinch-induced behavioural inhibition (clipthesia) as a restraint method for cats during veterinary examinations: preliminary results on cat susceptibility and welfare

By V. Nuti, C. Cantile, A. Gazzano, C. Sighieri, C. Mariti

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Abstract

Cats are often subjected to minimally painful or forced procedures during routine clinical practice, which can be poorly tolerated, leading veterinary surgeons to need to offer physical restraint, usually aided by an assistant. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness and ultimate welfare implications of using clipthesia as a method of restraint during veterinary examination. This was carried out in a real clinical setting and compared to manual scruffing. Twenty-seven cats were restrained, during a veterinary examination, using two stationery clips placed on the skin along the cervical dorsal midline, whilst a group of 13 cats were restrained through gentle manual scruffing. Susceptibility to clipthesia (ie a positive clip score) was observed in 81.5% of cats, while a complete response was found in 40.7% of subjects. The presence or absence of a disease/condition did not affect the susceptibility. Heart rate and the number of cats showing mydriasis (pupillary dilation) was statistically higher during manual scruffing, whilst plasma cortisol did not differ between the two groups. The more responsive the cats were to clipthesia, the more they displayed kneading and purring. These preliminary findings suggest that clipthesia is not more stressful than manual scruffing in restraining cats during a veterinary examination. However, not all cats were found to be susceptible to this method of restraint. Further research is needed to clarify whether clipthesia should be implemented as a matter of course in veterinary practice from the point of view of welfare and safety.

Publication Title Animal Welfare
Volume 25
Issue 1
Pages 115-123
ISBN/ISSN 0962-7286
Language English
Author Address Dipartimento di Scienze Veterinarie, Universita di Pisa, Viale delle Piagge 2, 56124 Pisa, Italy.cmariti@vet.unipi.it
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Nuti, V.; Cantile, C.; Gazzano, A.; Sighieri, C.; Mariti, C. (2016), "Pinch-induced behavioural inhibition (clipthesia) as a restraint method for cats during veterinary examinations: preliminary results on cat susceptibility and welfare," http://habricentral.org/resources/56208.

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Tags
  1. Adverse effects
  2. Animals
  3. Animal welfare
  4. Blood
  5. Carnivores
  6. Cats
  7. Clinical aspects
  8. Efficacy
  9. Heart
  10. Heart rate
  11. Hydrocortisone
  12. Inhibition
  13. Mammals
  14. Methodologies
  15. peer-reviewed
  16. restraint
  17. safety
  18. Stress
  19. susceptibility
  20. Techniques
  21. tolerance
  22. vertebrates
  23. Veterinarians
  24. veterinary practices
Badges
  1. peer-reviewed