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You are here: Home / Magazine Articles / Does Animal-Assisted Therapy Really Work? (What clinical trials reveal about the effectiveness of four-legged therapists), by Hal Herzog, Psychology Today, Nov 17 2014 / About

Does Animal-Assisted Therapy Really Work? (What clinical trials reveal about the effectiveness of four-legged therapists), by Hal Herzog, Psychology Today, Nov 17 2014

By Michael Fallon

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

View Link (HTM)

Licensed according to this deed.

Category Magazine Articles
Abstract

Dr. Hal Herzog, as part of his column, "Animals and Us" in Psychology Today, surveys the current literature on animal-assisted therapy and identifies a number of weaknesses in the existing literature, including a lack of a non-treatment control group, insufficient numbers of subjects, no controls for effects of novel experiences, no written manual spelling out the treatment procedures (important for standardization and replication), no use of “blind observations” to control for unconscious bias on the part of the researchers, reliance on self-reports rather than objective measures, lack of long-term follow-up studies, and putting a positive spin on negative results.  In concluding the article, Dr. Herzog writes that it is still not clear how important the animal is in animal-assisted therapy.

 

Publication Title Psychology Today
URL https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/animals-and-us/201411/does-animal-assisted-therapy-really-work
Language English
Tags
  1. Animal-assisted therapies
  2. Animal roles
  3. literature surveys
  4. Mammals