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Walking the thylacine: records of indigenous companion animals in Australian narrative and photographic history

By J. Philip, D. Garden

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Abstract

This report examines the history and significance of indigenous companion animals within traditional Aboriginal society and in early Euro-Australian settlements. Working from historical photographic and anthropological records, the project constructs a visual and written record of these often-transient human-animal relationships, including cockatoos who spoke in Aboriginal language; companion brolgas; and the traditions of raising the young of cassowary, emu, and dingo. It explores different pathways towards shared human and nonhuman animal spaces and how they found common ground outside of a contemporary model of domestication.

Publication Title Society & Animals
Volume 24
Issue 1
Pages 34-62
ISBN/ISSN 1063-1119
DOI 10.1163/15685306-12341386
Language English
Author Address Ecosystem Management, School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale NSW 2351, Australia.jphilip4@myune.edu.au
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Tags
  1. Animals
  2. Anthropology
  3. APEC countries
  4. Archaeology
  5. Australasia
  6. Australia
  7. Birds
  8. Canidae
  9. Canine
  10. Carnivores
  11. Commonwealth of Nations
  12. Countries
  13. Developed countries
  14. Domestication
  15. History
  16. Indigenous populations
  17. Mammals
  18. Oceania
  19. OECD countries
  20. Pets and companion animals
  21. Psychiatry and psychology
  22. Relationships
  23. Social psychology and social anthropology
  24. vertebrates
  25. Zoology