Support

Support Options

Report a problem

 
You are here: Home / Journal Articles / Randomized Controlled Theory-Based, E-Mail-Mediated Walking Intervention: Differences Between Dog Owners and Non-Dog Owners / About

Randomized Controlled Theory-Based, E-Mail-Mediated Walking Intervention: Differences Between Dog Owners and Non-Dog Owners

By Libby Richards1, Niwako Ogata, Ching-Wei Cheng

1. Purdue University School of Nursing

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of two concurrent randomized controlled interventions based on social cognitive theory to increase walking. A second purpose was to compare the efficacy of the intervention between two distinct groups: dog owners and non-dog owners. Adult dog owners (n = 40) and non-dog owners (n = 65) were randomized into control or intervention groups. Intervention groups received bi-weekly emails for first 4 weeks and then weekly email for the next 8 weeks targeting self-efficacy, social support, goal setting, and benefits/barriers to walking. Dog owner messages focused on dog walking while non-dog owners received general walking messages. Control groups received a 1-time email reviewing current physical activity guidelines. At 6 months, both intervention groups reported greater increases in walking and maintained these increases at 12 months. The greatest increases were seen in the dog owner intervention group. In conclusion, dog owners accumulated more walking, which may be attributed to the dog–owner relationship.

Submitter

Christopher C Charles super-administrator

Purdue University

Date 2016
Publication Title Clinical Nursing Research
DOI 10.1177/1054773816657799
Language English
Additional Language English
Tags
  1. Animal-assisted interventions
  2. Cardiovascular health
  3. Dogs
  4. Health
  5. Mammals
  6. physical activity
  7. randomized controlled trials
  8. social cognition
  9. Walking