Support

Support Options

Submit a Support Ticket

 
You are here: Home / Theses / The human-animal bond between domestically abused women and their companion animals do pets: affect a woman's decision making? / About

The human-animal bond between domestically abused women and their companion animals do pets: affect a woman's decision making?

By Debbie McBride

Category Theses
Abstract

This research will investigate the dynamics of human-perpetrated violence towards women and their companion animals. A small body of research indicates that abusers often threaten, hurt, or kill family pets as a means of coercing and controlling their female partners and women often delay seeking shelter out of concern for the welfare of their animals. This study explores the human-animal bond between women and their companion animals in the abusive relationship and their decision making. Through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 14 clients at two domestic violence shelters and one safe-house in Southern California. The study reviews the link between animal abuse and domestic violence, describes the implications of this research for social work practice, and offers suggestions and resources for integrating this content into future social work and policy making

Submitter

Katie Carroll

Date 2011
Pages 77
Publisher California State University San Marcos
Department Sociological Practice
Degree Master of Arts
URL http://hdl.handle.net/10211.8/109
Language English
University California State University San Marcos
Tags
  1. Abuse survivors
  2. Animal roles
  3. Animal welfare
  4. Cats
  5. Decision making
  6. Dogs
  7. Domestic violence
  8. Human-animal bond
  9. Mammals
  10. Pet ownership
  11. Pets and companion animals
  12. sexual abuse
  13. Violence
  14. Women