Support

Support Options

Report a problem

About you
About the problem
 
You are here: Home / Journal Articles / The Dog: A Domestic Wolf to Communicate with Man: The Aggressiveness of the Dog / About

The Dog: A Domestic Wolf to Communicate with Man: The Aggressiveness of the Dog

By Jean-Mane Giffroy

View Link (HTM)

Licensed under

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

On the basis of research in archeozoology and molecular genetics, it is established that the wolf is the main ancestor of the dog and that domestication would have occurred some 14,000 or 15,000 years ago, 5,000 years before the domestication of another species. The place or places of the first domestication are discussed and would be located on the Eurasian continent. The hypotheses on the reasons for the domestication of the dog and on the mechanism of the evolution of the canine species from the wolf are reviewed.
Archeozoology research and molecular genetics have now determined the origin of the canine species and of the first domestication: the wolf is thought to be the main ancestor of dogs, which were domesticated 14 to 15,000 years ago, ie 5,000 years before the domestication of another species . There are several hypotheses on the site or sites of this first domestication, all located on the Eurasian continent. The hypotheses on the reasons for the domestication of the dogs and the process by which the species evolved from wolfs are reviewed. The author describes a series of experiments which suggest that the domestication of dogs leads to a genetic selection improving their understanding of human visual cues and their communication with man.

Submitter

Katie Carroll

Date 2007
Publication Title Bulletin of the French Veterinary Academy
Volume 160
Issue 5
Pages 6
Publisher Veterinary Academy of France, Paris
DOI 10.4267/2042/47905
URL http://hdl.handle.net/2042/47905
Language French
Additional Language English
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. Aggression
  2. Animal behavior
  3. Animal roles
  4. Animals in culture
  5. Canine
  6. Communication
  7. Dogs
  8. Domestic animals
  9. Domestication
  10. Genetics
  11. Human-animal communication
  12. Human-animal relationships
  13. Mammals
  14. modification
  15. Pet ownership
  16. Pets and companion animals
  17. Wolves