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Dingoes at the Doorstep: Home Range Sizes and Activity Patterns of Dingoes and Other Wild Dogs around Urban Areas of North-Eastern Australia

By Alice T. McNeill, Luke K.P. Leung, Mark S. Goullet, Matthew N. Gentle, Benjamin L. Allen

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Abstract

Top-predators around the world are becoming increasingly intertwined with humans, sometimes causing conflict and increasing safety risks in urban areas. In Australia, dingoes and dingo×domesticdoghybridsarecommoninmanyurbanareas,andposeavarietyofhumanhealth and safety risks. However, data on urban dingo ecology is scant. We GPS-collared 37 dingoes in north-easternAustraliaandcontinuouslymonitoredthemeach30minfor11–394days. Mostdingoes were nocturnal, with an overall mean home range size of 17.47 km2. Overall mean daily distance travelled was 6.86 km/day. At all times dingoes were within 1000 m of houses and buildings. Home ranges appeared to be constrained to patches of suitable vegetation fragments within and around human habitation. These data can be used to reallocate dingo management effort towards mitigating actual conflicts between humans and dingoes in urban areas.

Submitter

Katie Carroll

Date 2016
Publication Title Animals
Volume 6
Issue 8
Pages 12
Publisher MDPI
DOI 10.3390/ani6080048
URL http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ani6080048
Language English
Additional Language English
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Tags
  1. Animal roles
  2. Australia
  3. Canine
  4. Dogs
  5. Ecosystems
  6. Habitats
  7. human-wildlife interactions
  8. Mammals
  9. Physical environment
  10. urban areas
  11. urbanization
  12. Wild animals
  13. wildlife
  14. wildlife management