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Understanding past human-animal relationships through the analysis of fractures: a case study from a Roman site in the Netherlands

By Maaike Groot

Category Conference Papers
Abstract

In studying fractures in archaeology, we should focus on what they can tell us about human-animal relationships. It is important to show other (zoo-) archaeologists that palaeopathology can be a valuable tool in answering (zoo-) archaeological questions. In this paper, a short summary of fracture types, healing, and complications is given and the problems and possibilities of studying fractures in palaeopathology are discussed. Nineteen fractures from a Romanperiod site in The Netherlands are then presented. Fracture prevalence rates for this site are discussed and compared with currently published data. Possible explanations for the high fracture rate in dogs are discussed, including maltreatment by humans and work-related injuries.

Submitter

Mason N McLary

HABRI Central

Date 2008
Pages 13
Publisher Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
ISBN/ISSN 978 1 4073 0331 4
Location of Publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Title Second ICAZ Animal Palaeopathology Working Group Conference
URL http://hdl.handle.net/1871/25600
Language English
Tags
  1. Animal roles
  2. Animals in culture
  3. Archaeology
  4. Dogs
  5. fracture
  6. History
  7. Human-animal relationships
  8. maltreatment
  9. Mammals
  10. Netherlands
  11. Physical environment
  12. Research
  13. Social Environments