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Animal Abuse and Interpersonal Violence: The Cruelty Connection and Its Implications for Veterinary Pathology

By R. Lockwood, Phil Arkow

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Abstract

The role of the veterinary forensic pathologist in the investigation of animal abuse or neglect can go beyond documenting the condition of animals presented as evidence. Although animal cruelty is a moral concern and a crime in itself, law enforcement response to such crimes is often enhanced by the recognition that crimes against animals can be both indicators of other ongoing crimes against people and predictors of the potential for interpersonal violence. An understanding of common motives underlying animal cruelty can aid the pathologist in asking appropriate questions. The authors review the forms of pathology evidence commonly seen in various presentations of animal cruelty. Understanding these forms of evidence can help the pathologist describe findings that can be significant for assessing the potential risks the alleged perpetrator may pose to other animals and humans. 

Submitter

Marcy Wilhelm-South

Purdue University

Publication Title Veterinary Pathology
Volume 53
Issue 5
Pages 910-918
Publisher Sage
DOI 10.1177/0300985815626575
URL http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0300985815626575
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • R. Lockwood; Phil Arkow (2018), "Animal Abuse and Interpersonal Violence: The Cruelty Connection and Its Implications for Veterinary Pathology," http://habricentral.org/resources/62720.

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Tags
  1. Animal cruelty
  2. Animals -- Law and legislation.
  3. Animal welfare
  4. Forensics
  5. open access
  6. pathology
  7. Psychiatry and psychology
  8. Veterinary forensic medicine.
Badges
  1. open access