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You are here: Home / Journal Articles / Human-animal interaction as a social determinant of health: descriptive findings from the health and retirement study / About

Human-animal interaction as a social determinant of health: descriptive findings from the health and retirement study

By M. K. Mueller, N. R. Gee, R. M. Bures

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Abstract

Publication Title BMC Public Health
Volume 18
Issue 1
Pages 305
ISBN/ISSN 1471-2458
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5188-0
Language eng
Author Address Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University; Tufts Institute for Human-Animal Interaction; Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life at Tufts University, North Grafton, MA, USA. megan.mueller@tufts.edu.Department of Psychology, State University of New York, Fredonia, NY, USA.WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutrition, Leicestershire, UK.Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
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Tags
  1. Age
  2. Aging
  3. Animals
  4. Bonds
  5. Cats
  6. Companion
  7. Depression
  8. Dogs
  9. Females
  10. Human-animal interactions
  11. Humans
  12. Longitudinal studies
  13. Males
  14. Middle Aged Adults
  15. Older adults
  16. Ownership
  17. United States of America