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The Biocultural Landscape of Zoonotic Disease: Examining Human-Animal Vulnerability to Anthrax on the Colombian-Venezuelan Border

By Jennifer Ashley Ida

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Category Theses
Abstract

The focus of this thesis is to provide a holistic understanding of the political, cultural, environmental, and biological factors that may be contributing to increased vulnerability to anthrax in Wayuu and non-Wayuu human and livestock communities in La Guajira, Colombia. Qualitative data collection was undertaken during a three month period from May to August 2014. A total of 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted with Wayuu and non-Wayuu herdowners, veterinarians, and government public health officials. Direct observations were collected on rancherías and farms in La Guajira throughout the duration of the study. The findings of this study suggest that the anthrax-drought relationship is mediated by several high-impact factors, primarily large and small scale animal movement. These anthropological insights will contribute to a greater understanding of human-animal relations in complex ecological contexts and to the ongoing reframing of international public health into a more holistic, locally-responsive, global health practice.

Submitter

Katie Osborn

Date 2016
Pages 2-136
Publisher University of Colorado, Boulder
Department Anthropology
Degree Master of Arts
URL https://scholar.colorado.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1060&context=anth_gradetds
Language English
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Jennifer Ashley Ida (2019), "The Biocultural Landscape of Zoonotic Disease: Examining Human-Animal Vulnerability to Anthrax on the Colombian-Venezuelan Border," http://habricentral.org/resources/64552.

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Tags
  1. Health
  2. human animal vulnerability
  3. pathogens
  4. Zoonoses