You are here: Home / Journal Articles / Preference for, and responsiveness to, people, dogs and objects in children with autism / About

Preference for, and responsiveness to, people, dogs and objects in children with autism

By A. Prothmann, C. Ettrich, S. Prothmann

View Link (HTM)

Licensed under

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

Autism strongly affects the ability to establish social interactions. However, there is some suggestion that people with autism establish close social relationships with nonverbal communicating and intentionally acting animals (such as dogs). In this study, 14 children with autism (3 females, 11 males; mean age=11.4 years) were observed when given the choice to interact with a person, dog (certified therapy dog) or objects (e.g., toys). The children interacted most frequently and for longest with the dog, followed by the person and then the objects. We suggest that animals, specifically dogs, communicate their intentions in a way more readily understandable to people with autism. We also suggest that autism affects predominantly interpersonal interactions.

Date 2009
Publication Title Anthrozoos
Volume 22
Issue 2
Pages 161-171
ISBN/ISSN 0892-7936
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.2752/175303709X434185
Language English
Author Address Technical University of Munich, University Hospital rechts der Isar, Children's Hospital, Koelner Platz 1, D-80804 Munich, Germany.anke.prothmann@lrz.tu-muenchen.de
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. Anthrozoology
  2. Children
  3. Dogs
  4. Interactions
  5. Mammals
  6. peer-reviewed
  7. Pets and companion animals
  8. Primates
  9. therapeutics
  10. therapy
Badges
  1. peer-reviewed