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  1. Canine Dominance Aggression Towards People

    Contributor(s): Cathy Taphorn, Donald D. Draper

    A common and potentially serious behavioral problem confronting pet owners and the sn1all animal practitioner is aggression. Of the several types of aggression, dominance aggression is the most common. Over one million people a year are bitten by dogs in the United States alone. 

  2. Model-Based Reverse Translation Between Veterinary and Human Medicine: The One Health Initiative

    Contributor(s): Benjamin Schneider, Violeta Balbas-Martinez, Albert E. Jergens, Inaki F. Troconiz

    There is growing concern about the limitations of rodent models with regard to recapitulation of human disease pathogenesis. Computational modeling of data from humans and animals sharing similar diseases provides an opportunity for parallel drug development in human and veterinary medicine....

  3. Making Your Practice and Facility More User-Friendly For Those With Disabilities

    Contributor(s): Rebecca Clow, Loren WIll

    As veterinarians, our duties extend beyond practicing medicine. We must realize that the veterinary profession requires excellent client communication and we must alter our way of practice to meet client needs. We must do more than compromise, empathize, and explain terms on a client's...

  4. Geriatric Program for the Small Animal Clinic

    Contributor(s): Katie Osborn, Molly Flaherty, Karen Campbell

    Geriatric medicine is becoming increasingly important in small animal practice. Although this area of practice is a relatively new focus, the benefits of such programs are becoming apparent to the veterinarian and clients. Pets are living longer and geriatric pets occupy a significant portion of...

  5. Future of Veterinary Medicine Explored at Student-Planned Conference

    Contributor(s): Mark Troxel, Jennifer Duster, Angela Daniels, Scanlon Daniels

    "The future is about hard work, new leadership, and organizational models that need to change. It's about changing our scope and our influences while concurrently functioning and changing in a world where our future is in a fast-forward mode." 

  6. IMPACT OF LIVESTOCK ANIMAL DISEASE OUTBREAKS ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE: A STUDY FOCUSING ON THE CURRENT FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE AND MAD COW DISEASE CRISES

    Contributor(s): Carolyn A Schwarz

    Ten years elapsed from the time the first case of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), commonly referred to as "mad cow disease,"' was discovered in Great Britain, until researchers confirmed that BSE was responsible for many human deaths

  7. Marketing Animal-Friendly Products: Addressing the Consumer Social Dilemma with Reinforcement Positioning Strategies

    Contributor(s): Lenka van Riemsdijk, Paul T.M. Ingenbleek, Hans C.M. van Trijp, Gerrita van deer Veen

    This article presents a conceptual framework that aims to encourage consumer animal-friendly product choice by introducing positioning strategies for animal-friendly products. These strategies reinforce the animal welfare with different types of consumption values and can therefore reduce...

  8. A Moveable Beast: Subjective Influence of Human-Animal Relationships on Risk Perception, and Risk Behaviour during Bushfire Threat

    Contributor(s): Katie Osborn, Joshua L. Trigg, Kirrilly Thomspon, Bradley Smith, Pauleen Bennett

    This article examines how human-animal connections influence risk perception and behaviour in companion animal guardians exposed to bushfire threat in Australia. Although the objective role of psychological bonds with companion animals is well accepted by researchers, subjective interpretations...

  9. To Group or Not to Group? Good Practice for Housing Male Laboratory Mice

    Contributor(s): Sarah Kappel, Penny Hawkins, Michael T. Mendl

    It is widely recommended to group-house male laboratory mice because they are ‘social animals’, but male mice do not naturally share territories and aggression can be a serious welfare problem. Even without aggression, not all animals within a group will be in a state of positive...

  10. An Exploration of Industry Expert Perception of Equine Welfare Using Vignettes

    Contributor(s): Cordelie DuBois, Helen Hambly-Odame, Derek B. Haley, Katrina Merkies

    As part of a larger Delphi survey project, equine professionals (n = 14) were presented with twelve short scenarios in which a horse’s welfare could be compromised. They were asked to rank each scenario (with 0 indicating no welfare concerns and 5 indicating a situation where...

  11. Open Knowledge about Slaughter on the Internet—A Case Study on Controversies

    Contributor(s): Anne Algers, Charlotte Berg

    Animal products are consumed by a large majority of the global population, yet public knowledge about animal handling and welfare during the slaughter process is limited. An open educational resource about slaughter, called “Animal welfare at slaughter and killing” has been openly...

  12. Efficacy of Blunt Force Trauma, a Novel Mechanical Cervical Dislocation Device, and a Non-Penetrating Captive Bolt Device for On-Farm Euthanasia of Pre-Weaned Kits, Growers, and Adult Commercial Meat Rabbits

    Contributor(s): Jessica L. Walsh, Aaron Percival, Patricia V. Turner

    Developing effective and humane on-farm euthanasia methods is essential for all livestock industries to ensure that animals do not suffer and are killed humanely. Approved methods are lacking for commercial meat rabbits, potentially leading to poor welfare. We assessed several methods of on-farm...

  13. Is a "Good Death" at the Time of Animal Slaughter an Essentially Contested Concept?

    Contributor(s): Qurat ulAin, Terry L. Whiting

    The question of how to kill animals for food has persisted unresolved in the Anglo-American and European social and political discourse for more than a century. Scientific informed narrative has been directed at “documenting” the experience of the slaughtered animal in the last few...

  14. Assessment of Plumage and Integument Condition in Dual-Purpose Breeds and Conventional Layers

    Contributor(s): Mona Franziska Giersberg, Birgit Spindler

    The assessment of plumage and integument condition in laying hens provides useful information about the occurrence of feather pecking and cannibalism. Although feather loss and skin injuries can result from mechanical abrasion or clinical diseases, they are valid animal-based indicators for...

  15. Should the Contribution of One Additional Lame Cow Depend on How Many Other Cows on the Farm Are Lame?

    Contributor(s): Peter Sandoe, Bjorn Forkman, Franziska Hakansson, Sine Norlander Andreasen, Rikke Nohr, Matt Denwood, Thomas Boker Lund

    Welfare Quality® proposes a system for aggregation according to which the total welfare score for a group of animals is a non-linear effect of the prevalence of welfare scores across the individuals within the group. Three assumptions serve to justify this: (1) experts do not follow a...

  16. Selection of Meat Inspection Data for an Animal Welfare Index in Cattle and Pigs in Denmark

    Contributor(s): Katie Osborn, Soren Saxmose Nielson, Matthew James Denwood, Bjorn Forkman, Hans Houe

    Despite being important to the general public, the monitoring of animal welfare is not systematic. The Danish political parties agreed in 2012 to establish national animal welfare indices for cattle and pigs, and here we assess the potential for using data from the systematic meat inspection to...

  17. Influence of Maternal Care on Behavioural Development of Domestic Dogs (Canis Familiaris) Living in a Home Environment

    Contributor(s): Giovanna Guardini, Jon Bowen, Chiara Mariti, Jaume Fatjo, Claudio Sighieri, Angelo Gazzano

    Maternal care has been shown to affect the development of the brain, behaviour, social skills and emotional systems of the young of many mammalian species including dogs. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of maternal care on the behavioural responses of family dog puppies...

  18. Using Free Adoptions to Reduce Crowding and Euthanasia at Cat Shelters: An Australian Case Study

    Contributor(s): Heather M. Crawford, Joseph B. Fontaine, Michael C. Calver

    Many healthy adult cats are euthanised annually in shelters, and novel approaches are required to reduce euthanasia rates. Waiving adoption fees is one such approach. However, concerns that less responsible owners will be attracted to free events persist among welfare groups. We evaluated...

  19. Brazilian Citizens: Expectations Regarding Dairy Cattle Welfare and Awareness of Contentious Practices

    Contributor(s): Clarissa S. Cardoso, Marina A.G. von Keyserlingk, Marie Jose Hotzel

    The primary aim of this study was to explore attitudes of urban Brazilian citizens about dairy production. A secondary aim was to determine their knowledge and attitudes about four potentially contentious routine dairy cattle management practices: early cow-calf separation; zero-grazing; culling...

  20. The Mental Homologies of Mammals. Towards an Understanding of Another Mammals World View

    Contributor(s): Marthe Kiley-Worthington

    Mammals’ mental homologies include that they look after their young, suckle and protect them; they acquire information about the world by learning. They have five types of sensory receptors and a brain to analyze the information and they feel: that is they are sentient. Mental homologies...