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  1. A Comparison of Cats (Felis silvestris catus) Housed in Groups and Single Cages at a Shelter: A Retrospective Matched Cohort Study

    Contributor(s): Malini Suchak, Jacalyn Lamica

    When cats are relinquished to shelters, they frequently experience a great deal of stress. Shelters often try to control certain aspects of their environment, such as housing, to help them relax. Some cats are placed in small group rooms upon entry, whereas others are placed in single cages....

  2. The Impact of Excluding Food Guarding from a Standardized Behavioral Canine Assessment in Animal Shelters

    Contributor(s): Heather Mohan-Gibbons, Emily D Dolan, Pamela Reid, Margaret R Slater, Hugh Mulligan, Emily Weiss

    Many shelters euthanize or restrict adoptions for dogs that exhibit food guarding while in the animal shelter. However, previous research showed that only half the dogs exhibiting food guarding during an assessment food guard in the home. So, dogs are often misidentified as future food guarders...

  3. Online Relinquishments of Dogs and Cats in Australia

    Contributor(s): Susan J Hazel, Caitlin J Jenvey, Jonathan Tuke

    The aim of this study was to analyze dog and cat advertisements on a popular online trading website in Australia in February 2016. A total of 2640 ads for dogs and 2093 ads for cats were classified as being relinquished on Gumtree. A total of 23% of dog ads and 62% of cat ads were for free...

  4. Surrenderers' Relationships with Cats Admitted to Four Australian Animal Shelters

    Contributor(s): Sarah Zito, Mandy Paterson, John Morton, Di Vankan, Pauleen Bennett, Jacquie Rand, Clive J.C. Phillips

    The surrender of cats to animal shelters results in financial, social and moral burdens for the community. Correlations of caretaking and interactions with surrendered cats were calculated, to understand more about humans’ relationships with surrendered cats and the contribution of...

  5. Email Reminders Increase the Frequency That Pet Owners Update Their Microchip Information

    Contributor(s): Katie Goodwin, Jacquie Rand, John Morton, Varun Uthappa, Rick Walduck

    Many stray animals presented to shelters in several first world nations have incorrect contact details associated with their microchip and, consequently, cannot be reunited with their owners. This study investigated whether sending email reminders increased the frequency that pet owners updated...

  6. Speaking Up: Veterinary Ethical Responsibilities and Animal Welfare Issues in Everyday Practice

    Contributor(s): Elein Hernandez, Anne Fawcett, Emily Brouwer, Jeff Rau, Patricia V Turner

    Although expectations for appropriate animal care are present in most developed countries, significant animal welfare challenges continue to be seen on a regular basis in all areas of veterinary practice. Veterinary ethics is a relatively new area of educational focus but is thought to be...

  7. A Case Study in Citizen Science: The Effectiveness of a Trap-Neuter-Return Program in a Chicago Neighborhood

    Contributor(s): Daniel D. Spehar, Peter J. Wolf

    The use of trap-neuter-return (TNR) as a method of managing free-roaming cat populations has increased in the United States in recent decades. Historically, TNR has been conducted most often at a grassroots level, which has led to inconsistent data collection and assessment practices....

  8. Search Methods Used to Locate Missing Cats and Locations Where Missing Cats Are Found

    Contributor(s): Liyan Huang, Marcia Coradini, Jacquie Rand, John Morton, Kat Albrecht, Brigid Wasson

    A least 15% of cat owners lose their pet in a five-year period and some are never found. This paper reports on data gathered from an online questionnaire that asked questions regarding search methods used to locate missing cats and locations where missing cats were found. The most important...

  9. Attitudes of Veterinary Teaching Staff and Exposure of Veterinary Students to Early-Age Desexing, with Review of Current Early-Age Desexing Literature

    Contributor(s): Alannah Jupe, Jacquie Rand, John Morton, Sophie Fleming

    Approximately 50% of cats admitted to Australian shelters are kittens, and 26% of dogs are puppies, and, particularly for cats, euthanasia rates are often high. Cats can be pregnant by 4 months of age, yet the traditional desexing age is 5–6 months, and studies in Australasia and Nth...

  10. Equine-Facilitated Therapy and Trauma: Current Knowledge, Future Needs

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s): Marlys Staudt, Donna Cherry

    Equine-facilitated therapy (EFT) is a relatively new treatment for trauma and PTSD. EFT as well as animal assisted interventions in general have been introduced and implemented in mental health treatment for children and adults, though the research in support of these interventions has not kept...

  11. Evaluation of the Dogs, Physical Activity, and Walking (Dogs PAW) Intervention: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Contributor(s): Elizabeth Richards, N. Ogata, C. Cheng

    Background. To facilitate physical activity (PA) adoption and maintenance, promotion of innovative population-level strategies that focus on incorporating moderate intensity, lifestyle PA are needed. Objectives. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the Dogs, Physical...

  12. It's Raining Cats and Dogs in Children's Books

    Contributor(s): Janet Alsup

    Animals appearing in children’s books are nothing new. From The Cat in the Hat and The Velveteen Rabbit, to The Very Hungry Caterpillar and Olivia the Pig, animals are a recurrent presence in popular picture books. There are also many memorable animal figures in novels popular with teens,...

  13. ANIMAL-ASSISTED ACTIVITIES: Effects of Animals on Positive Emotional Display in Children in Inclusion Classrooms

    Contributor(s): Katie Osborn, Gayatri Mazgaonkar

    Animals are commonly present in classrooms and may be an important tool in enhancing children’s experiences, especially in inclusion classrooms that provide integrative learning for both typically developing children and children with special needs. The purpose of this study was to...

  14. Setting the farm animal welfare scene in North America; Estabelcendo o Cenário de Bem-Estar Animal NA América fo Norte

    Contributor(s): Katie Osborn, Anna K. Johnson

    The main areas of interest that this paper will address are to, set the scene on what animal welfare is, the schools that one can subscribe and how this could influence the direction that farm animal welfare could go. Second, to provide an overview on some of the critical farm animal welfare...

  15. Tickling Rats: Differential Benefits for Pet Store Rats

    Contributor(s): Whitney Blankenberger

    Animal welfare and the effects of the human-animal bond are becoming increasingly important to researchers and the public. Animal use in biomedical research is indispensable and inevitably creates stressful situations for the animals. One way to mediate this stress and improve rat welfare is by...

  16. Canine Dominance Aggression Towards People

    Contributor(s): Cathy Taphorn, Donald D. Draper

    A common and potentially serious behavioral problem confronting pet owners and the sn1all animal practitioner is aggression. Of the several types of aggression, dominance aggression is the most common. Over one million people a year are bitten by dogs in the United States alone. 

  17. Model-Based Reverse Translation Between Veterinary and Human Medicine: The One Health Initiative

    Contributor(s): Benjamin Schneider, Violeta Balbas-Martinez, Albert E. Jergens, Inaki F. Troconiz

    There is growing concern about the limitations of rodent models with regard to recapitulation of human disease pathogenesis. Computational modeling of data from humans and animals sharing similar diseases provides an opportunity for parallel drug development in human and veterinary medicine....

  18. Making Your Practice and Facility More User-Friendly For Those With Disabilities

    Contributor(s): Rebecca Clow, Loren WIll

    As veterinarians, our duties extend beyond practicing medicine. We must realize that the veterinary profession requires excellent client communication and we must alter our way of practice to meet client needs. We must do more than compromise, empathize, and explain terms on a client's...

  19. Geriatric Program for the Small Animal Clinic

    Contributor(s): Katie Osborn, Molly Flaherty, Karen Campbell

    Geriatric medicine is becoming increasingly important in small animal practice. Although this area of practice is a relatively new focus, the benefits of such programs are becoming apparent to the veterinarian and clients. Pets are living longer and geriatric pets occupy a significant portion of...

  20. Future of Veterinary Medicine Explored at Student-Planned Conference

    Contributor(s): Mark Troxel, Jennifer Duster, Angela Daniels, Scanlon Daniels

    "The future is about hard work, new leadership, and organizational models that need to change. It's about changing our scope and our influences while concurrently functioning and changing in a world where our future is in a fast-forward mode."