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  1. The design of visitation facilities to engage patients with their own cats and dogs

    Contributor(s):: Perez-Camargo, G., Creagan, E. T.

  2. Resolution of alliance ruptures: The special case of animal-assisted psychotherapy

    Contributor(s):: Zilcha-Mano, S.

  3. Animal-assisted dyadic therapy: A therapy model promoting development of the reflective function in the parent-child bond

    Contributor(s):: Shani, L.

  4. Standing the test of time: Reflecting on the relevance today of Levinson's Pet-Oriented Child Psychotherapy

    Contributor(s):: Fine, A. H.

  5. Animal-assisted psychotherapy: A unique relational therapy for children and adolescents

    Contributor(s):: Bachi, K., Parish-Plass, N.

  6. Animal-assisted interventions: A national survey of health and safety policies in hospitals, eldercare facilities, and therapy animal organizations

    Contributor(s):: Linder, D. E., Gibbs, D. M., Siebens, H. C., Mueller, M. K., Freeman, L. M.

  7. Affectionate Interactions of Cats with Children Having Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: lynette arnason hart, abigail p thigpen, Neil H Willits, Leslie A. Lyons, Irva Hertz-Picciotto, Benjamin L Hart

    Mental and physical benefits of dogs have been reported for adults and children with special needs, but less is known about benefits of cats for children. A cat that can be held by a child could provide important therapeutic companionship for children with severe or less severe autism spectrum...

  8. They Say Emotional Support Dog, We Say Service Dog: Why the Americans with Disabilities Act Should Recognize Emotional Support Dogs as Service Animals

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Chelsea Hernandez-Silk

    This article explores the laws surrounding emotional support animals. Specifically, the author analyzes the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Fair Housing Act, and the Air Carrier Access Act. This article proposes that emotional support animals should be recognized under federal legislation...

  9. Effect of hippotherapy in the global motor coordination in individuals with Down Syndrome

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Marcy Wilhelm-South, Valéria Sovat de Freitas Costa, Hudday Mendes da Silva, Monique de Azevêdo, André Ribeiro da Silva, Ludmila Lucena Pereira Cabral, Jonatas de França Barros

    Introduction: Down syndrome (DS) of all genetic syndromes is the most common. In Hippotherapy, three-dimensional movements, provided by horse walking, awaken in the body of children with DS a large amount of sensory and neuromuscular stimuli, which directly interfere with overall development...

  10. Impact of an animal-assisted therapy programme on physiological and psychosocial variables of paediatric oncology patients

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Nathiana B. Silva, Flávia L. Osório

    The objective of this study was to propose an intervention and safety protocol for performing animal-assisted therapy (AAT) and evaluating its efficacy in children under outpatient oncological treatment based on psychological, physiological, and quality of life indicators for the children and...

  11. Animal-assisted intervention in the ICU: a tool for humanization

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Megan M. Hosey, Janice Jaskluski, Stephen T. Wegener, Linda L. Chlan, Dale M. Needham

    The combination of an aging population and advances in critical care medicine is resulting in a growing number of survivors of critical illness [1]. Survivors’ descriptions of their stay in an intensive care unit (ICU) are frequently filled with traumatic events, and include experiences...

  12. Effects of therapeutic horseback riding on post-traumatic stress disorder in military veterans

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Rebecca A Johnson, David L. Albright, James R. Marzolf, Jessica L. Bibbo, Hayley D. Yaglom, Sandra M. Crowder, Gretchen Carlisle, Amy Willard, Cynthia L. Russell, Karen Grindler, Steven Osterlind, Marita Wassman, Nathan Harms, Marcy Wilhelm-South

    Background Large numbers of post-deployment U.S. veterans are diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or traumatic brain injury (TBI), leading to an urgent need for effective interventions to reduce symptoms and increase veterans’ coping. PTSD includes anxiety,...

  13. Child-Canine Bonding in Children with ASD: Findings Within and Across Case Studies

    | Contributor(s):: Kathryn Struik, John-Tyler Binfet

     The demand for support for families impacted by Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) continues to grow, and one increasingly popular avenue of support is the use of companion canines. Parents searching for service canines trained to work with children with ASD, however, face formidable...

  14. Equine-Facilitated Therapy and Trauma: Current Knowledge, Future Needs

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Marlys Staudt, Donna Cherry

    Equine-facilitated therapy (EFT) is a relatively new treatment for trauma and PTSD. EFT as well as animal assisted interventions in general have been introduced and implemented in mental health treatment for children and adults, though the research in support of these interventions has not kept...

  15. Does Hippotherapy Improve Gross Motor Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy?

    | Contributor(s):: Rachel Y. Maestas

    Cerebral palsy (CP) refers to a group of non-progressive disorders of movement and posture caused by abnormal development of, or damage to, motor control centers of the brain. CP is caused by events before, during, or after birth. The abnormalities of muscle control that define CP are often...

  16. Integration of Animal-Assisted Therapy Standards in Pediatric Occupational Therapy

    | Contributor(s):: Sara J. Shue, Melissa Y. Winkle, M J Mulcahey

    The primary purpose of this study was to describe how the best practice recommendations and standards of practice related to animal-assisted therapy (AAT) are being incorporated into pediatric occupational therapy (OT). The study design was a nonexperimental survey that identified the...

  17. Human–Animal Interaction and Older Adults: An Overview

    | Contributor(s):: Nancy R. Gee, Megan K. Mueller, Angela L. Curl

    Both pet ownership and animal-assisted therapy are becoming increasingly popular in the United States, and the science of human–animal interaction (HAI) seeks to explore how these relationships with animals can impact health and well-being. In particular, one burgeoning area of research is...

  18. Practices and Perceptions of Animal Contact and Associated Health Outcomes in Pregnant Women and New Mothers

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Hsin-Yi Weng, Kimberly Ankrom

    Companion animals play an important role in our society. However, pregnant women and new mothers might have specific concerns about animal-associated health outcomes because of their altered immune function and posture as well as their newborn babies. The study was conducted to collect baseline...

  19. A Birth Cohort Analysis to Study Dog Walking in Adolescence Shows No Relationship with Objectively Measured Physical Activity

    | Contributor(s):: Carri Westgarth, Andrew R. Ness, Calum Mattocks, Robert M. Christley

    Physical inactivity during childhood and adolescence is a serious health concern. There are few studies of the activity undertaken by adolescents when walking with the family dog, and the effect of this on objectively measured physical activity levels. Objective measures of physical activity...

  20. Comparing the Effect of Animal-Rearing Education in Japan with Conventional Animal-Assisted Education

    | Contributor(s):: Yuka Nakajima

    An increasing number of teachers are introducing animals into their class so that pupils foster cognitive, physiological, and social skills through their interaction with animals. Along with such an educational style termed animal-assisted education (AAE), Japanese formal education has also...