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  1. Emerging and re-emerging zoonoses of dogs and cats

    Contributor(s):: Chomel, B. B.

    Since the middle of the 20th century, pets are more frequently considered as "family members" within households. However, cats and dogs still can be a source of human infection by various zoonotic pathogens. Among emerging or re-emerging zoonoses, viral diseases, such as rabies (mainly from dog...

  2. Animals in Healthcare Facilities: Recommendations to Minimize Potential Risks

    Contributor(s):: Murthy, Rekha, Bearman, Gonzalo, Brown, Sherrill, Bryant, Kristina, Chinn, Raymond, Hewlett, Angela, George, B. Glenn, Goldstein, Ellie J. C., Holzmann-Pazgal, Galit, Rupp, Mark E., Wiemken, Timothy, Weese, J. Scott, Weber, David J.

  3. Enteric pathogens of dogs and cats with public health implications

    Contributor(s):: Kantere, M., Athanasiou, L. V., Chatzopoulos, D. C., Spyrou, V., Valiakos, G., Kontos, V., Billinis, C.

    Dogs and cats play an important role in modern society, enhancing the psychological and physiological well-being of many people. However, there are well-documented health risks associated with human animal interactions. More specifically, enteric pathogens of zoonotic risk which are transmitted...

  4. Best practices for planning events encouraging human-animal interactions

    Contributor(s):: Erdozain, G., Kukanich, K., Chapman, B., Powell, D.

    Educational events encouraging human-animal interaction include the risk of zoonotic disease transmission. It is estimated that 14% of all disease in the USA caused by Campylobacter spp., Cryptosporidium spp., Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157, non-O157 STECs, Listeria...

  5. Environmental contamination by dog’s faeces: a public health problem?

    Contributor(s):: Cinquepalmi, Vittoria, Monno, Rosa, Fumarola, Luciana, Ventrella, Gianpiero, Calia, Carla, Greco, Maria Fiorella, De Vito, Danila, Soleo, Leonardo

  6. Information need of owners regarding dog's healthcare, zoonotic diseases and marketing

    Contributor(s):: Basarajappa, A. D., Rupasi, Tiwari, Rakesh, Roy, Davinder, Singh, Matt, V. T., Devan, Arora

    The present study was purposively conducted at Clinical Complex, VeterinaryCollege, Hebbal, Bangalore; Referral Polyclinic, IVRI, Izatnagar; Veterinary polyclinic, GBPUAT, Pantnagar and Veterinary hospital, Palam, New Delhi, India. From each clinical complex, 50 pet dog owners were selected...

  7. Veterinarians' role for pet owners facing pet loss

    Contributor(s):: Fernandez-Mehler, P., Gloor, P., Sager, E., Lewis, F. I., Glaus, T. M.

  8. Foraging Eurasian badgers Meles meles and the presence of cattle in pastures. Do badgers avoid cattle?

    Contributor(s):: Mullen, E. M., MacWhite, T., Maher, P. K., Kelly, D. J., Marples, N. M., Good, M.

  9. The welfare of ferrets (Mustela putorius furo T): a review on the housing and management of pet ferrets

    Contributor(s):: Vinke, C. M., Schoemaker, N. J.

  10. Investigations on genetic disease resistance in swine - a contribution to the reduction of pain, suffering and damage in farm animals. (Special Issue: Animal suffering and welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Reiner, G.

    This review deals with genetic disease resistance in pigs as a prospective opportunity to reduce pain, suffering and damage in swine production. Even under favourable terms of housing and management, infectious diseases are wide-spread, and have to be ranked among the major sources for suffering...

  11. All creatures great and minute: a public policy primer for companion animal zoonoses

    Contributor(s):: Reaser, J. K., Clark, E. E., Jr., Meyers, N. M.

    Approximately 63% of US households have at least one pet, a large percentage of which are considered family members. Pet owners can derive substantial physical and psychological benefits from interaction with companion animals. However, pet ownership is not without risks; zoonotic diseases are...

  12. Compendium of measures to prevent disease associated with animals in public settings, 2007: National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, Inc. (NASPHV)

    Certain venues encourage or permit the public to contact animals, resulting in millions of human-animal interactions each year. These settings include county or state fairs, petting zoos, animal swap meets, pet stores, zoologic institutions, circuses, carnivals, farm tours, livestock-birthing...

  13. Compendium of measures to prevent disease associated with animals in public settings, 2009 National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, Inc. (NASPHV)

    Certain venues encourage or permit the public to be in contact with animals, resulting in millions of human-animal interactions each year. These settings include county or state fairs, petting zoos, animal swap meets, pet stores, zoologic institutions, circuses, carnivals, educational farms,...

  14. Avian companions and the human-animal bond

    Contributor(s):: Harris, J. M.

  15. Colorado animal-based plague surveillance systems: relationships between targeted animal species and prediction efficacy of areas at risk for humans

    Contributor(s):: Lowell, J. L., Eisen, R. J., Schotthoefer, A. M., Liang, X. C., Montenieri, J. A., Tanda, D., Pape, J., Schriefer, M. E., Antolin, M. F., Gage, K. L.

    Human plague risks (Yersinia pestis infection) are greatest when epizootics cause high mortality among this bacterium's natural rodent hosts. Therefore, health departments in plague-endemic areas commonly establish animal-based surveillance programs to monitor Y. pestis infection among plague...

  16. What are the differences in management and disease between pet and commercial goats?

    Contributor(s):: Roe, V.

    This study was conducted to determine the differences in management and environment and the common disease problems between pet and commercial goats. Goat owners (n=38) were given questionnaires covering the type of enterprise, management and disease. The owners were categorized using both the...

  17. Management and mastitis

    Contributor(s):: Francis, P. G.

    This is the abstr. of a paper presented at the Winter Meeting of the Society for Veterinary Ethology, which was held in London, UK on 3 Dec. 1980. Various measures were investigated to reduce the Escherichia coli population in cubicle (free-stall) straw bedding during a 5-month winter period.

  18. Human handling, flock size and responses to an E. coli challenge in young chickens

    Contributor(s):: Collins, N. W., Siegel, P. B.

    The effects of human handling and flock size on physiological, behavioural and production traits of female chickens were examined in two flocks of 10 and 20 chicks handled gently and spoken to for 1 minute, 3 days a week, and in two similar groups which were not handled. Pullets maintained in...

  19. Pet ownership and knowledge of zoonotic diseases in De Kalb County, Georgia

    Contributor(s):: Fontaine, R. E., Schantz, P. M.

    In a telephone survey in September 1986, 62% of interviewed households had pets (42% with dogs and 30% with cats). Respondents were poorly informed about the potential health hazards associated with animals. Only 63% of household heads believed that diseases of pets could be transmitted to humans...

  20. Comparison of indoor and captive, free-roaming management in golden-headed lion tamarins ( Leontopithecus chrysomelas ) at Zurich Zoo

    Contributor(s):: Steinmetz, H. W., Zingg, R., Ossent, P., Eulenberger, U., Clauss, M., Hatt, J. M.

    Traditional husbandry practices for the public display of Callitrichidae involve strict separation of animals and public. An important consideration for the evaluation of such management is the occurrence of health problems and potential zoonotic risks. This study compared animal data and...