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  1. Intersucking in dairy cattle - review and questionnaire. (Special Issue: Behaviour and welfare of cattle)

    Contributor(s):: Lidfors, L., Isberg, L.

    Intersucking is an abnormal behaviour in dairy heifers and cows, and it is defined by one animal sucking the teat of another animal with the intention of sucking milk. The aim of this paper is to review earlier studies on intersucking in dairy cattle and to present results from a questionnaire...

  2. Investigations on genetic disease resistance in swine - a contribution to the reduction of pain, suffering and damage in farm animals. (Special Issue: Animal suffering and welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Reiner, G.

    This review deals with genetic disease resistance in pigs as a prospective opportunity to reduce pain, suffering and damage in swine production. Even under favourable terms of housing and management, infectious diseases are wide-spread, and have to be ranked among the major sources for suffering...

  3. Tail biting in fattening pigs: associations between frequency of tail biting and other abnormal behaviours

    Contributor(s):: Brunberg, E., Wallenbeck, A., Keeling, L. J.

    This study investigated the association between tail biting (TB) and other abnormal behaviours in a group of non-tail docked pigs. Behavioural data were collected from 742 pigs housed on a commercial farm. The prevalence of performed and received TB, belly nosing, bar biting, ear biting and...

  4. Use of cattle troughs by badgers ( Meles meles ): a potential route for the transmission of bovine tuberculosis ( Mycobacterium bovis ) to cattle

    Contributor(s):: Garnett, B. T., Roper, T. J., Delahay, R. J.

    Cattle feedtroughs that are contaminated with badger excreta constitute a potential transmission route for the spread of bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) from badgers (Meles meles) to cattle. In order to investigate the maximum height to which a trough would have to be raised to make it...

  5. Peritoneal dialysis and living with animals [Spanish]

    Contributor(s):: Gómez Castilla, A. C., Martin Espejo, J. L.

  6. Cat-scratch disease and the role of the domestic cat: vector, reservoir, and victim?

    Contributor(s):: Kirkpatrick, C. E., Glickman, L. T.

    Cat-scratch disease (CSD) of humans is briefly described, with information on the probable agent, an unidentified coccobacillus. The disease has been significantly associated with intimate contact with cats, and a hypothesis is presented, proposing that: the agent causing CSD in humans is carried...

  7. All creatures great and minute: a public policy primer for companion animal zoonoses

    Contributor(s):: Reaser, J. K., Clark, E. E., Jr., Meyers, N. M.

    Approximately 63% of US households have at least one pet, a large percentage of which are considered family members. Pet owners can derive substantial physical and psychological benefits from interaction with companion animals. However, pet ownership is not without risks; zoonotic diseases are...

  8. Livestock-associated MRSA: epidemiology in animal production chains, transmission to humans and charateristics of the clone

    Contributor(s):: Wagenaar, J. A., Giessen, A. van de

    MRSA infections in people working with pigs was confirmed in 2005. Dutch data from 9 abattoirs showed that 39% of pigs and 81% of slaughter batches was contaminated with MRSA. All strains belonged to the sequence type ST398. This clone is now known as livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA). A...

  9. Compendium of measures to prevent disease associated with animals in public settings, 2007: National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, Inc. (NASPHV)

    Certain venues encourage or permit the public to contact animals, resulting in millions of human-animal interactions each year. These settings include county or state fairs, petting zoos, animal swap meets, pet stores, zoologic institutions, circuses, carnivals, farm tours, livestock-birthing...

  10. Compendium of measures to prevent disease associated with animals in public settings, 2009 National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, Inc. (NASPHV)

    Certain venues encourage or permit the public to be in contact with animals, resulting in millions of human-animal interactions each year. These settings include county or state fairs, petting zoos, animal swap meets, pet stores, zoologic institutions, circuses, carnivals, educational farms,...

  11. Modeling the relationship between food animal health and human foodborne illness

    Contributor(s):: Singer, R. S., Cox, L. A., Jr., Dickson, J. S., Hurd, H. S., Phillips, I., Miller, G. Y.

    To achieve further reductions in foodborne illness levels in humans, effective pre-harvest interventions are needed. The health status of food animals that are destined to enter the human food supply chain may be an important, although often overlooked, factor in predicting the risk of human...

  12. Molecular investigation of relatedness of Campylobacter coli isolated from child with campylobacteriosis and healthy, household dog

    Contributor(s):: Wardak, S., Duda, U., Wojsa, B.

    Thermotolerant species of Campylobacter (mainly C. jejuni and C. coli) are among the most frequently isolated bacterial agents of gastroenteritis in many developed countries. C. coli is less prevalent than C. jejuni. The main reservoir of C. coli is swine, however this pathogen may also be found...

  13. Avian companions and the human-animal bond

    Contributor(s):: Harris, J. M.

  14. Colorado animal-based plague surveillance systems: relationships between targeted animal species and prediction efficacy of areas at risk for humans

    Contributor(s):: Lowell, J. L., Eisen, R. J., Schotthoefer, A. M., Liang, X. C., Montenieri, J. A., Tanda, D., Pape, J., Schriefer, M. E., Antolin, M. F., Gage, K. L.

    Human plague risks (Yersinia pestis infection) are greatest when epizootics cause high mortality among this bacterium's natural rodent hosts. Therefore, health departments in plague-endemic areas commonly establish animal-based surveillance programs to monitor Y. pestis infection among plague...

  15. What are the differences in management and disease between pet and commercial goats?

    Contributor(s):: Roe, V.

    This study was conducted to determine the differences in management and environment and the common disease problems between pet and commercial goats. Goat owners (n=38) were given questionnaires covering the type of enterprise, management and disease. The owners were categorized using both the...

  16. Interfacing genetics, behavior and husbandry in White Leghorns presented with E. coli challenge

    Contributor(s):: Mauldin, J. M., Siegel, P. B., Gross, W. B.

    Female fowls from the 3rd and 4th generations of lines which had undergone selection for persistence and non-persistence of antibody production to sheep erythrocytes were reared as floor flocks to 134 or 242 days of age, and were then reared singly in cages. At 295 or 394 days of age, females...

  17. Management and mastitis

    Contributor(s):: Francis, P. G.

    This is the abstr. of a paper presented at the Winter Meeting of the Society for Veterinary Ethology, which was held in London, UK on 3 Dec. 1980. Various measures were investigated to reduce the Escherichia coli population in cubicle (free-stall) straw bedding during a 5-month winter period.

  18. The behavioural responses of badgers ( Meles meles ) to exclusion from farm buildings using an electric fence

    Contributor(s):: Tolhurst, B. A., Ward, A. I., Delahay, R. J., MacMaster, A. M., Roper, T. J.

    Behavioural investigations into the transmission of bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) between badgers and cattle suggest that badger activity in farm buildings may incur a significant risk of cross-infection. However, measures to exclude badgers from buildings have not been systematically...

  19. Ranging behaviour of European badgers ( Meles meles ) in relation to bovine tuberculosis ( Mycobacterium bovis ) infection

    Contributor(s):: Garnett, B. T., Delahay, R. J., Roper, T. J.

    Using radio-telemetry and direct observation, we monitored the ranging and foraging behaviour, habitat use and sett use of eight same-sex pairs of badgers (Meles meles L.). Members of each pair were of the same age-class and were members of the same social group, but differed with respect to...

  20. Behaviour of pigs with viral and bacterial pneumonia

    Contributor(s):: Escobar, J., Alstine, W. G. van, Baker, D. H., Johnson, R. W.

    The behavioural response to infection is well organized and may enhance disease resistance and facilitate recovery, but the behaviour of pigs with an acute respiratory infection has not been assessed. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate behaviour of pigs inoculated with...