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  1. A Systematic Review of Complimentary Therapies to Treat Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in the Aftermath of Domestic Abuse

    Contributor(s):: Jordan A. Meeks, Saida Byrami

    Objectives: Explore the impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) on the health of female survivors. Identify complementary therapies that alleviate symptoms of psychological health impacts of IPV on women’s health.Method: An exhaustive search of published, peer reviewed...

  2. An examination of the relations between human attachment, pet attachment, depression, and anxiety

    Contributor(s):: Quinn, Aaron Christopher

    The roles of pets in families and their positive impact on mood have been reported by some studies (Becker, 1999; Garrity, Stallones, Marx, & Johnson, 1989). Additionally, some research has found that the more attached humans are to their pets, the more they feel emotionally supported...

  3. Animal companions and one-year survival of patients after discharge from a coronary care unit

    Contributor(s):: Friedmann, E., Katcher, A. H., Lynch, J. J., Thomas, S. A.

    Article from a special issue on Human--companion animal bond

  4. Animal-Assisted Therapy on Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Contributor(s):: Alba Méndez Moreno

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a common, incurable neurodevelopmental disorder impairing the individual’s capacity of social communication and interaction. There is not any pharmacological treatment available for this disorder affecting about 1% of children worldwide, which creates a...

  5. Anticipatory grief and pet loss preparation

    Contributor(s):: Gardner, M., McVety, D.

  6. Are therapy dogs like xanax? Does animal-assisted therapy impact processes relevant to cognitive behavioral psychotherapy?

    Contributor(s):: Hunt, M. G., Chizkov, R. R.

    Despite an increase in the popularity of animal-assisted therapy, little is known about the impact of animals on processes relevant to effective psychotherapy. This study tested the impact of having a dog present on process variables relevant to cognitive behavioral therapy, including emotional...

  7. Attachment styles impact on pet visitation effectiveness

    Contributor(s):: Colby, Patrcia M., Sherman, Angela

    Examined the effects of attachment style (secure, anxious-ambivalent, dismissive avoidant, or fearful avoidant) on the subjective well-being of institutionalized older adults participating in a dog visitation program. The participants were 52 residents of an assisted living facility, aged 58-98...

  8. Behavioral responses of nursing home residents to visits from a person with a dog, a robot seal or a toy cat

    Contributor(s):: Thodberg, K., Sorensen, L. U., Videbech, P. B., Poulsen, P. H., Houbak, B., Damgaard, V., Keseler, I., Edwards, D., Christensen, J. W.

    Previous studies suggest that contact with dogs can positively affect the wellbeing of elderly people in nursing homes, but there is a lack of research investigating the causal pathways of these effects. One such pathway may relate to the behavioral responses of the elderly when interacting with...

  9. Behavioral responses of nursing home residents to visits from a person with a dog, a robot seal or a toy cat

    Contributor(s):: Thodberg, K., Sorensen, L. U., Videbech, P. B., Poulsen, P. H., Houbak, B., Damgaard, V., Keseler, I., Edwards, D., Christensen, J. W.

    Previous studies suggest that contact with dogs can positively affect the wellbeing of elderly people in nursing homes, but there is a lack of research investigating the causal pathways of these effects. One such pathway may relate to the behavioral responses of the elderly when interacting with...

  10. Behavioral responses of nursing home residents to visits from a person with a dog, a robot seal or a toy cat

    Contributor(s):: Thodberg, K., Sorensen, L. U., Videbech, P. B., Poulsen, P. H., Houbak, B., Damgaard, V., Keseler, I., Edwards, D., Christensen, J. W.

    Previous studies suggest that contact with dogs can positively affect the wellbeing of elderly people in nursing homes, but there is a lack of research investigating the causal pathways of these effects. One such pathway may relate to the behavioral responses of the elderly when interacting with...

  11. Beliefs About Animal Assisted Interventions Among Medical Social Workers

    Contributor(s):: Gyda D. Boyd

    Animal‑Assisted Intervention (AAI) is used to significantly reduce pain, lower blood pressure, decrease anxiety, and help ease depression in people with a range of health problems; however, it is not readily used in the hospital setting. Research involving the Human‑Animal Bond (HAB) is well...

  12. Biophilia: the Therapeutic Value of Animals in the Treatment of Depression

    Contributor(s):: Christian Antonioli

    Background: To date there has been limited evidence on the efficacy of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This thesis comprises two studies: A randomized, single blind, controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of animal facilitated therapy (AFT) in the treatment of depression (study...

  13. Brittany Cerny

    http://habricentral.org/members/4771

  14. Characterization of interaction between owner and dog treated at the veterinary hospital of Federal University of Uberlandia

    Contributor(s):: Santana, J. A., Castro, I. P. de, Almeida, L. P. de

    Increasing urbanization has increased the proximity of people with dogs. An inappropriate interaction between them can be the cause of several behavioral disorders such as aggression and depression by both the man and the animal. Thus, we proposed to conduct a survey to assess the management and...

  15. Companion-animals' effectiveness in managing chronic pain in adult community members

    Contributor(s):: Bradley, L., Bennett, P. C.

    Therapy animals have been found to alleviate pain in healthcare settings, but companion-animal owners report greater discomfort and use more analgesics than people who do not own one or more companion animals. To investigate this anomaly, 173 adults completed an online survey that included...

  16. Complementary medicine in cancer care: adding a therapy dog to the team

    Contributor(s):: Marcus, D. A.

  17. Depression, loneliness, and pet attachment in homebound older adult cat and dog owners

    Contributor(s):: Sandy M. Branson, Lisa Boss, Stanley Cron, Dennis C. Turner

    Background: Companion animals may reduce depression and loneliness in socially isolated homebound older adults. However, whether owning a cat or dog is more beneficial in this population remains unknown.Materials and Methods: Pet attachment and the levels of depressive symptoms and loneliness...

  18. Development of the pet bereavement questionnaire

    Contributor(s):: Hunt, M., Padilla, Y.

    The death of a pet can be a significant stressor for some people and is a known risk factor for depression. The Pet Bereavement Questionnaire (PBQ) was developed to fill the need for a brief, acceptable, well-validated instrument for use in studies of the psychological impact of losing a pet....

  19. Do animal-assisted activities effectively treat depression? A meta-analysis

    Contributor(s):: Souter, M. A., Miller, M. D.

    We conducted a meta-analysis to determine the effectiveness of animal-assisted activities (AAA) and animal-assisted therapy (AAT) for reducing depressive symptoms in humans. To be included in the meta-analysis, studies had to demonstrate random assignment, include a comparison/control group, use...

  20. Dog Walking - The Health Benefits