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Tags: Face

All Categories (1-20 of 55)

  1. Human Facial Recognition by Northern Mockingbirds

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jessica A. Stehlin, Janice Crook-Hill, Brad Bailey

    A number of studies have examined the ability of various animal species to recognize individual humans, but only a few have focused on native, non-captive birds. Previous research demonstrated that American Crows learn to recognize individual human faces. Other research indicated that Northern...

  2. The Processing of Human Emotional Faces by Pet and Lab Dogs: Evidence for Lateralization and Experience Effects

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Anjuli L.A. Barber, Dania Randi, Corsin A. Müller, Ludwig Huber

    From all non-human animals dogs are very likely the best decoders of human behavior. In addition to a high sensitivity to human attentive status and to ostensive cues, they are able to distinguish between individual human faces and even between human facial expressions. However, so far little...

  3. Infants' Daily Experience With Pets and Their Scanning of Animal Faces

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Karinna Hurley, Lisa M Oakes

    Very little is known about the effect of pet experience on cognitive development in infancy. In Experiment 1, we document in a large sample (N = 1270) that 63% of families with infants under 12 months have at least one household pet. The potential effect on development is significant as...

  4. Face processing of animal and human static stimuli by children with autism spectrum disorder: a pilot study

    | Contributor(s):: Grandgeorge, M., Degrez, C., Alavi, Z., Lemonnier, E.

    Animals are part of humans' social environment and present numerous benefits. Each partner in a human-animal interaction uses signals emitted by the other (e.g. postures, gestures or gaze directions) to collect information to adjust their behaviour. Face processing impairment is associated with...

  5. Dogs recognize dog and human emotions

    | Contributor(s):: Albuquerque, N., Guo, Kun, Wilkinson, A., Savalli, C., Otta, E., Mills, D.

    The perception of emotional expressions allows animals to evaluate the social intentions and motivations of each other. This usually takes place within species; however, in the case of domestic dogs, it might be advantageous to recognize the emotions of humans as well as other dogs. In this...

  6. Identification and development of measures suitable as potential breeding traits regarding dairy cows' reactivity towards humans

    | Contributor(s):: Ebinghaus, A., Ivemeyer, S., Rupp, J., Knierim, U.

    Behavioural indicators of the human-animal relationship (HAR) are predominantly used in animal welfare science. However, the reactivity of dairy cows - as part of the HAR - is also of interest in the context of dairy breeding, due to its estimated moderate heritability. The avoidance distance...

  7. Man's other best friend: domestic cats (F. silvestris catus) and their discrimination of human emotion cues

    | Contributor(s):: Galvan, M., Vonk, J.

  8. Human Empathy, Personality and Experience Affect the Emotion Ratings of Dog and Human Facial Expressions

    | Contributor(s):: Miiamaaria V. Kujala, Sanni Somppi, Markus Jokela, Outi Vainio, Lauri Parkkonen

    Facial expressions are important for humans in communicating emotions to the conspecifics and enhancing interpersonal understanding. Many muscles producing facial expressions in humans are also found in domestic dogs, but little is known about how humans perceive dog facial expressions, and which...

  9. Pet face: Mechanisms underlying human-animal relationships

    | Contributor(s):: Borgi, Marta, Cirulli, Francesca

  10. Visual attention and facial identification in human and non-human animals

    | Contributor(s):: Guo, Kun, Freund, Lisa S., McCune, Sandra, Esposito, Layla, Gee, Nancy R., McCardle, Peggy

  11. Do domestic dogs recognize emotional incongruence in human faces and voices?

    | Contributor(s):: Allison Hagley

    Dogs have had a close relationship with humans for more than 10,000 years, but the effects of artificial selection on canine cognition are only recently being studied. Studies have confirmed the beliefs of pet owners – dogs recognize human faces and voices – and that dogs are...

  12. Development of a facial expression scale using footrot and mastitis as models of pain in sheep

    | Contributor(s):: McLennan, K. M., Rebelo, C. J. B., Corke, M. J., Holmes, M. A., Leach, M. C., Constantino-Casas, F.

    Management of pain in sheep is limited by the challenges of recognising and accurately quantifying pain in this species. The use of facial expression scoring to assess pain is a well-utilised, practical tool in both humans and non-human animals. The objective of this study was to develop a...

  13. Evaluation of an innovative approach for sensory enrichment in zoos: semiochemical stimulation for captive lions ( Panthera leo)

    | Contributor(s):: Martinez-Macipe, M., Lafont-Lecuelle, C., Manteca, X., Pageat, P., Cozzi, A.

    Despite improvements in zoo housing and management conditions over the last years, zoo animals may still present undesirable behaviours, such as aggression, stereotypies, boredom and a general absence of natural behaviours. In order to improve animal welfare, researchers are constantly looking...

  14. Pet Experience and Infants' Visual Attention to Animal Faces

    | Contributor(s):: Hurley, Karinna B.

  15. Preference for human eyes in human infants

    | Contributor(s):: Dupierrix, Eve, de Boisferon, Anne Hillairet, Méary, David, Lee, Kang, Quinn, Paul C., Di Giorgio, Elisa, Simion, Francesca, Tomonaga, Masaki, Pascalis, Olivier

  16. Dogs can discriminate emotional expressions of human faces

    | Contributor(s):: Muller, C. A., Schmitt, K., Barber, A. L. A., Huber, L.

    The question of whether animals have emotions and respond to the emotional expressions of others has become a focus of research in the last decade. However, to date, no study has convincingly shown that animals discriminate between emotional expressions of heterospecifics, excluding the...

  17. Discrimination of human and dog faces and inversion responses in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris)

    | Contributor(s):: Anais Racca, Eleonora Amadei, Severine Ligout, Kun Guo, Kerstin Meints, Daniel Mills

    Although domestic dogs can respond to many facial cues displayed by other dogs and humans, it remains unclear whether they can differentiate individual dogs or humans based on facial cues alone and, if so, whether they would demonstrate the face inversion effect, a behavioural hallmark commonly...

  18. Reading Faces: Differential Lateral Gaze Bias in Processing Canine and Human Facial Expressions in Dogs and 4-Year-Old Children

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Anais Racca, Kun Guo, Kerstin Meints, Daniel S. Mills

    Sensitivity to the emotions of others provides clear biological advantages. However, in the case of heterospecific relationships, such as that existing between dogs and humans, there are additional challenges since some elements of the expression of emotions are species-specific. Given that faces...

  19. Effects of genetic selection for residual feed intake on behavioral reactivity of castrated male pigs to novel stimuli tests

    | Contributor(s):: Colpoys, J. D., Abell, C. E., Young, J. M., Keating, A. F., Gabler, N. K., Millman, S. T., Siegford, J. M., Johnson, A. K.

    Increasing feed efficiency in swine is important for increasing sustainable food production and profitability for producers; therefore, this is often selected for at breeding. Residual feed intake (RFI) can be used for the genetic selection of pigs for feed efficiency. In our selection project,...

  20. Discrimination of familiar human faces in dogs (Canis familiaris)

    | Contributor(s):: Ludwig Huber, Anais Racca, Billy Scaf, Zsofia Viranyi, Friederike Range

    Faces are an important visual category for many taxa, and the human face is no exception to this. Because faces differ in subtle ways and possess many idiosyncratic features, they provide a rich source of perceptual cues. A fair amount of those cues are learned through social interactions and are...