You are here: Home / Tags / Injuries / All Categories

Tags: Injuries

All Categories (1-20 of 76)

  1. Concentrations of Plasma Nucleosomes but Not Cell-Free DNA Are Prognostic in Dogs Following Trauma

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jo-Annie Letendre, Robert Goggs

    Trauma is common in dogs and causes significant morbidity and mortality, but it remains a challenge to assess prognosis in these patients. This study aimed to investigate the use of plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and nucleosome concentrations as prognostic biomarkers in canine trauma. Using a...

  2. Survey of personal injuries caused by dogs and cats in Umea

    | Contributor(s):: R Lindström, S Tegenborg, PO Bylund, U Björnstig, A Eriksson

  3. Penile Injuries in Immunocastrated and Entire Male Pigs of One Fattening Farm

    | Contributor(s):: Simon Reiter, Susanne Zols, Mathias Ritzmann, Volker Stefanski, Ulrike Weiler

    Penile injuries in boars have been discussed as a relevant welfare problem in pork production with entire males (EM). The incidence of penile injuries with immunocastrated boars has not been described so far. Thus, it was the aim of this study to systematically compare frequency and severity of...

  4. Practices and Perceptions of Animal Contact and Associated Health Outcomes in Pregnant Women and New Mothers

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Hsin-Yi Weng, Kimberly Ankrom

    Companion animals play an important role in our society. However, pregnant women and new mothers might have specific concerns about animal-associated health outcomes because of their altered immune function and posture as well as their newborn babies. The study was conducted to collect baseline...

  5. Human-animal interactions and safety during dairy cattle handling - comparing moving cows to milking and hoof trimming

    | Contributor(s):: Lindahl, C., Pinzke, S., Herlin, A., Keeling, L. J.

    Cattle handling is a dangerous activity on dairy farms, and cows are a major cause of injuries to livestock handlers. Even if dairy cows are generally tranquil and docile, when situations occur that they perceive or remember as aversive, they may become agitated and hazardous to handle. This...

  6. Worker injuries involving the interaction of cattle, cattle handlers, and farm structures or equipment

    | Contributor(s):: Shannon L. Fox

    Cattle and other livestock have been identified as leading sources of injuries to workers in agriculture. Cattle handling injuries can be serious and often appear to be under-reported [superscript]3,[superscript]4. Many of these injuries involve predictable patterns of interactions among victims,...

  7. Changes in the Welfare of an Injured Working Farm Dog Assessed Using the Five Domains Model

    | Contributor(s):: Katherine E. Littlewood, David J. Mellor

    The present structured, systematic and comprehensive welfare evaluation of an injured working farm dog using the Five Domains Model is of interest in its own right. It is also an example for others wanting to apply the Model to welfare evaluations in different species and contexts. Six stages of...

  8. Using the Horse Grimace Scale (HGS) to Assess Pain Associated with Acute Laminitis in Horses (Equus caballus)

    | Contributor(s):: Katie Carroll, Emanuela Dalla Costa, Diana Stucke, Francesca Dai, Michela Minero, Matthew C. Leach, Dirk Lebelt

    Acute laminitis is a common equine disease characterized by intense foot pain, both acutely and chronically. The Obel grading system is the most widely accepted method for describing the severity of laminitis by equine practitioners, however this method requires movement (walk and trot) of the...

  9. Horse Injury during Non-Commercial Transport: Findings from Researcher-Assisted Intercept Surveys at Southeastern Australian Equestrian Events

    | Contributor(s):: Christopher B. Riley, Belinda R. Noble, Janis Bridges, Susan J. Hazel, Kirrilly Thompson

    Equine transportation research has largely focused on the commercial land movement of horses. Data on the incidence and factors associated with horse injuries during non-commercial transportation (privately owned horse trucks and trailers) is scant. This study surveyed 223 drivers transporting...

  10. Analysis of Failure to Finish a Race in a Cohort of Thoroughbred Racehorses in New Zealand

    | Contributor(s):: Jasmine Tanner, Chris Rogers, Charlotte Bolwell, Naomi Cogger, Erica Gee, Wayne McIlwraith

    The objective was to describe the incidence of failure to finish a race in flat-racing Thoroughbreds in New Zealand as these are summary indicators of falls, injuries and poor performance. Retrospective data on six complete flat racing seasons (n = 188,615 race starts) of all Thoroughbred flat...

  11. Preventing and Investigating Horse-Related Human Injury and Fatality in Work and Non-Work Equestrian Environments: A Consideration of the Workplace Health and Safety Framework

    | Contributor(s):: Meredith Chapman, Kirrilly Thompson

    It has been suggested that one in five riders will be injured due to a fall from a horse, resulting in severe head or torso injuries. Attempts to reduce injury have primarily focussed on low level risk controls, such as helmets. In comparison, risk mitigation in high risk workplaces and sports is...

  12. Worker injuries involving the interaction of cattle, cattle handlers, and farm structures or equipment

    | Contributor(s):: S. Fox, Mitchell Ricketts, J. Ernest Minton

    Cattle have been identified as leading sources of injuries to agricultural workers. The present study focused on worker injuries that involved the interaction of cattle, cattle handlers, and farm structures or equipment. The goal of the study was to identify opportunities for injury prevention....

  13. Improving the Understanding of Psychological Factors Contributing to Horse-Related Accident and Injury: Context, Loss of Focus, Cognitive Errors and Rigidity

    | Contributor(s):: Jodi DeAraugo, Suzanne McLaren, Phil McManus, Paul D. McGreevy

    While the role of the horse in riding hazards is well recognised, little attention has been paid to the role of specific theoretical psychological processes of humans in contributing to and mitigating risk. The injury, mortality or compensation claim rates for participants in the horse-racing...

  14. Factors Influencing the Safety Behavior of German Equestrians: Attitudes towards Protective Equipment and Peer Behaviors

    | Contributor(s):: Christina-Maria Ikinger, Jana Baldamus, Achim Spiller

    Human interactions with horses entail certain risks. Although the acceptance and use of protective gear is increasing, a high number of incidents and very low or inconsistent voluntary use of safety equipment are reported. While past studies have examined factors influencing the use of safety...

  15. Look Before You Leap: What Are the Obstacles to Risk Calculation in the Equestrian Sport of Eventing?

    | Contributor(s):: Denzil O'Brien

    All horse-riding is risky. In competitive horse sports, eventing is considered the riskiest, and is often characterised as very dangerous. But based on what data? There has been considerable research on the risks and unwanted outcomes of horse-riding in general, and on particular subsets of...

  16. Reconciling Horse Welfare, Worker Safety, and Public Expectations: Horse Event Incident Management Systems in Australia

    | Contributor(s):: Julie M. Fiedler, Paul D. McGreevy

    Human-horse interactions have a rich tradition and can be highly rewarding, particularly within sport and recreation pursuits, but they can also be dangerous or even life-threatening. In parallel, sport and recreation pursuits involving animals, including horses, are facing an increased level of...

  17. The Contribution of Equitation Science to Minimising Horse-Related Risks to Humans

    | Contributor(s):: Melissa Starling, Andrew McLean, Paul McGreevy

    Equitation science is an evidence-based approach to horse training and riding that focuses on a thorough understanding of both equine ethology and learning theory. This combination leads to more effective horse training, but also plays a role in keeping horse riders and trainers safe around...

  18. The Management of Horses during Fireworks in New Zealand

    | Contributor(s):: Gabriella Gronqvist, Chris Rogers, Erica Gee

    Within popular press there has been much coverage of the negative effects associated with firework and horses. The effect of fireworks has been documented in companion animals, yet no studies have investigated the negative effects, or otherwise, of fireworks on horses. This study aims to document...

  19. The knowledge, perception and utilization of equine chiropractic by horse riders in KwaZulu-Natal

    | Contributor(s):: Kirsten Moya Snow

    Background:  Horses are unlike most animals as they take part in equine sports and thus are athletic animals.  Comparable to a human athlete, horses are prone to sports related injuries and disease. Equine  chiropractic has shown to be one of the most utilized forms of...

  20. Poisonous Snakes and Snakebite in the U.S.: A Brief Review

    | Contributor(s):: Sherman A. Minton

    This article briefly reviews some current ideas regarding snakebite in the Uniled States. Twenty species of native venomous snakes occur and include 15 species of rattlesnakes, the copperhead and cottonmouth, two species of coral snakes, and one seasnake. Snake venoms contain a variety of...