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All Categories (1-20 of 29)

  1. IMPACT OF LIVESTOCK ANIMAL DISEASE OUTBREAKS ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE: A STUDY FOCUSING ON THE CURRENT FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE AND MAD COW DISEASE CRISES

    Contributor(s):: Carolyn A Schwarz

    Ten years elapsed from the time the first case of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), commonly referred to as "mad cow disease,"' was discovered in Great Britain, until researchers confirmed that BSE was responsible for many human deaths

  2. Modeling The Zoonotic Transmission Dynamics Of Nipah Virus: Implications For Outbreak Control And Model-Guided Fieldwork

    Contributor(s):: Natasha Wenzel

    Introduction: Nipah virus is considered a biosafety level-4 pathogen that is endemic to bats of the genus Pteropus. Infection in humans presents clinically as febrile encephalitis with an extremely high case-fatality rate (78.2%). Outbreaks of Nipah virus infection have occurred in Bangladesh and...

  3. Anticipating the Outbreak of Zoonotic Infectious Diseases Related to Animal Industry

    Contributor(s):: R.D. W. Bagja

    Keeping and using animals and animal products is an age-old recognition. There are many reasons to own animals and some are as follows: 1. The Animal products are rich sources of essential protein needed by human being so they are farmed for meat or other animal products. 2. The animals which...

  4. Potential role of wildlife in pathogenic contamination of fresh produce

    Contributor(s):: Langholz, Jeff A., Jay-Russell, Michele T.

  5. Characteristics of a canine distemper virus outbreak in Dichato, Chile following the February 2010 earthquake

    Contributor(s):: Garde, E., Perez, G., Acosta-Jamett, G., Bronsvoort, B. M.

    Following the earthquake and tsunami disaster in Chile in February 2010, residents of Dichato reported high morbidity and mortality in dogs, descriptions of which resembled canine distemper virus (CDV). To assess the situation, free vaccine clinics were offered in April and May. Owner...

  6. Quantitative assessment of human and pet exposure to Salmonella associated with dry pet foods

    Contributor(s):: Lambertini, E., Buchanan, R. L., Narrod, C., Ford, R. M., Baker, R. C., Pradhan, A. K.

    Recent Salmonella outbreaks associated with dry pet foods and treats highlight the importance of these foods as previously overlooked exposure vehicles for both pets and humans. In the last decade efforts have been made to raise the safety of this class of products, for instance by upgrading...

  7. Rabies in Iowa

    Contributor(s):: Bernie Napolski

    Iowa has one of the highest rates of rabies outbreaks in the country and there is very little the state legislature can do about it. To deal with rabies effectively, the state would have to get to the source of the major portion of rabies cases in Iowa - the skunk.

  8. Will a hiding box provide stress reduction for shelter cats?

    Contributor(s):: Vinke, C. M., Godijn, L. M., Leij, W. J. R. van der

    Domestic cats ( Felis sylvestris catus) can experience serious stress in shelters. Stressful experiences can have a major impact on the cats' welfare and may cause higher incidences of infectious diseases in the shelters due to raised cortisol levels causing immunodeficiency. Though several...

  9. Animal disease and human trauma: the psychosocial implications of the 2001 UK foot and mouth disease disaster

    Contributor(s):: Mort, M., Baxter, J., Bailey, C., Convery, I.

    The 2001 UK foot and mouth disease (FMD) crisis is commonly understood to have been a nonhuman animal problem, an economic industrial crisis that was resolved after eradication. By using a different lens, a longitudinal ethnographic study of the health and social consequences of the epidemic, the...

  10. Caring During Crisis: Animal Welfare During Pandemics and Natural Disasters

    Contributor(s):: Millman, S. T.

    From April 29 to May 1, 2007, the University of Guelph hosted a symposium, Caring During Crisis: Animal Welfare During Pandemics and Natural Disasters, with the objectives (a) of raising awareness about how nonhuman animals and the people who care for them are affected during emergencies and (b)...

  11. Special welfare concerns in countries dependent on live animal trade: the real foreign animal disease emergency for Canada

    Contributor(s):: Whiting, T. L.

    Any outbreak of an Office International des Epizooties trade-disrupting (previously List-A) disease, such as classical swine fever or foot and mouth disease in a previously disease-free region can have severe consequences for nonhuman animal welfare. In addition to animals destroyed for the...

  12. The impact of epizootics on livelihoods

    Contributor(s):: Heath, S. E.

    Epizootics (nonhuman animal disease epidemics) can have detrimental impacts on livelihoods through a complex interaction of demographic trends, food production, and animal disease. Differences in the rate of demographic shifts, including rates of population growth, economic growth, urbanization,...

  13. Welfare assessments based on lifetime health and production data in Danish dairy cows

    Contributor(s):: Houe, H., Sandoe, P., Thomsen, P. T.

    The objective of this study was to describe how information about the whole lifetime of the cow can be used when defining nonhuman animal-based criteria of the welfare of animals on the farm. Often measured over a short period, disease occurrence provides information relevant for assessing the...

  14. Why should we care about nonhuman animals during times of crisis?

    Contributor(s):: Appleby, M. C., Stokes, T.

    Incentives to care for nonhuman animals derive in part from the extent to which people depend on animals for food, for livelihood, and for cultural and psychological reasons as well as from the duty to protect animals in their care. When attention is turned to solving and preventing animal...

  15. Tail biting behaviour and tail damage in pigs and the relationship with general behaviour: predicting the inevitable?

    Contributor(s):: Ursinus, W. W., Reenen, C. G. van, Kemp, B., Bolhuis, J. E.

    Tail biting behaviour in pigs is a common problem in conventional housing systems. Our study examined the consistency over time in tail biting and tail damage and it explored the predictive value of general behaviours observed in individual pigs and in pens as a whole. Pigs ( n=480), reared in...

  16. Zoonoses: Animal to human diseases

    Contributor(s):: E. Fevre, D. Grace

    This resource is a media briefing regarding the control of zoonotic diseases, the Bird Flu outbreak in China, and the connection between urban agriculture and human health.

  17. An evaluation of dog-assisted therapy for residents of aged care facilities with dementia

    Contributor(s):: Travers, C., Perkins, J., Rand, J., Bartlett, H., Morton, J.

  18. Infectious diseases associated with relation between humans and wildlife - consideration on wild bird mortality and bird-feeding

    Contributor(s):: Fukui, D.

  19. Mounting behaviour in finishing pigs: stable individual differences are not due to dominance or stage of sexual development

    Contributor(s):: Hintze, S., Scott, D., Turner, S., Meddle, S. L., D'Eath, R. B.

  20. Stress measures in tail biters and bitten pigs in a matched case-control study

    Contributor(s):: Munsterhjelm, C., Brunberg, E., Heinonen, M., Keeling, L., Valros, A.