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  1. Using GPS Technology to Understand Spatial and Temporal Activity of Kangaroos in a Peri-Urban Environment

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Timothy Henderson, Karl Vernes, Gerhard Kortner, Rajanathan Rajaratnam

    Kangaroo–human conflict is increasing in the peri-urban communities of the New South Wales (NSW) north coast in Australia. A way to assist in managing this conflict is to improve our understanding on the ecology of kangaroos in the peri-urban environment. We utilized modern Global...

  2. Emotional support animals on commercial flights: a risk to allergic patients

    | Contributor(s):: Brian C. Baumann, Kelly M MacArthur, John C. Baumann

  3. How nature can be used to create a therapeutic outdoor environment

    | Contributor(s):: Carol Davis

  4. A companion dog increases prosocial behavior in work groups

    | Contributor(s):: Colarelli, S. M.

    Although organizations use a variety of interventions to improve group functioning, getting people to work effectively with each other remains challenging. Because the presence of a dog has been shown to have positive effects on mood and dyadic interaction, we expected that the presence of a...

  5. Decolonising the Waters: Interspecies Encounters Between Sharks and Humans

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Zan Hammerton, Akkadia Ford Dr.

    Often portrayed as ‘man–eaters’, sharks are one of the most maligned apex species on earth. Media representation has fuelled public imagination, perpetuating fear and negative stereotypes of sharks and hysteria around human-shark interactions; whilst government initiatives...

  6. Zoo Registrars: A Bewildering Bureaucracy

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Katie Osborn, Irus Braverman

    While their counterparts in the museum world have received some scholarly attention, no scholarly account of zoo registrars has been published to date. Why bother studying zoo registrars? Firstly, in the (contained) wildness of the zoo, the registrar performs the role of law and order. She...

  7. Potential Role of Pet Cats As a Sentinel Species for Human Exposure to Flame Retardants

    | Contributor(s):: Luis A. Henríquez-Hernández, Elena Carretón, María Camacho, José Alberto Montoya-Alonso, Luis D. Boada, Verónica Bernal Martín, Yaiza Falcón Cordón, Soraya Falcón Cordón, Manuel Zumbado, Octavio P. Luzardo

    Flame retardants are a wide group of chemicals used by the industry to avoid combustion of materials. These substances are commonly found in plastics, electronic equipment, fabrics, and in many other everyday articles. Subsequently, ubiquitous environmental contamination by these common chemical...

  8. Minor Immediate Effects of a Dog on Children's Reading Performance and Physiology

    | Contributor(s):: Lisa Schretzmayer, Kurt Kotrschal, Andrea Beetz

    Literacy is a key factor in occupational success and social integration. However, an increasing number of children lack appropriate reading skills. There is growing evidence that dogs have positive effects on reading performance. We investigated the short-term effects of dogs on reading...

  9. Caregiver Reports of Interactions between Children up to 6 Years and Their Family Dog—Implications for Dog Bite Prevention

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Christine Arhant, Andrea Martina Beetz, Josef Troxler

    In children up to 6 years, interactions such as interfering with the dog’s resources and also benign behaviors (e.g., petting) commonly precede a bite incident with the family dog. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to explore the development of everyday interactions between...

  10. Practices and Perceptions of Animal Contact and Associated Health Outcomes in Pregnant Women and New Mothers

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Hsin-Yi Weng, Kimberly Ankrom

    Companion animals play an important role in our society. However, pregnant women and new mothers might have specific concerns about animal-associated health outcomes because of their altered immune function and posture as well as their newborn babies. The study was conducted to collect baseline...

  11. A Birth Cohort Analysis to Study Dog Walking in Adolescence Shows No Relationship with Objectively Measured Physical Activity

    | Contributor(s):: Carri Westgarth, Andrew R. Ness, Calum Mattocks, Robert M. Christley

    Physical inactivity during childhood and adolescence is a serious health concern. There are few studies of the activity undertaken by adolescents when walking with the family dog, and the effect of this on objectively measured physical activity levels. Objective measures of physical activity...

  12. Canine Detection of the Volatilome: A Review of Implications for Pathogen and Disease Detection

    | Contributor(s):: Craig Angle, Lowell Paul Waggoner, Arny Ferrando, Pamela Haney, Thomas Passler

    The volatilome is the entire set of volatile organic compounds (VOC) produced by an organism. The accumulation of VOC inside and outside of the body reflects the unique metabolic state of an organism. Scientists are developing technologies to non-invasively detect VOC for the purposes of medical...

  13. Assistance Dogs: Historic Patterns and Roles of Dogs Placed by ADI or IGDF Accredited Facilities and by Non-Accredited U.S. Facilities

    | Contributor(s):: Sandra Walther, Mariko Yamamoto, Abigail Paige Thigpen, Anaissa Garcia, Neil H. Willits, Lynette A. Hart

    Dogs’ roles to support people with disabilities are increasing. Existing U.S. laws and regulations pertaining to the use of dogs for people with disabilities are only minimally enforced. Pushback legislation against some aspects of uses of assistance dogs currently is being passed or...

  14. Prevalence of Canine Obesity, Obesity-Related Metabolic Dysfunction, and Relationship with Owner Obesity in an Obesogenic Region of Spain

    | Contributor(s):: J. Alberto Montoya-Alonso, Inmaculada Bautista-Castaño, Cristina Peña, Lourdes Suárez, M. Candelaria Juste, Asta Tvarijonaviciute

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of canine obesity and obesity-related metabolic dysfunction (ORMD) in the obesogenic area in Spain. The prevalence of overweight/obesity among owners of obese pets was also evaluated. In the sample population studied (93 client-owned...

  15. Application of Survival Analysis and Multistate Modeling to Understand Animal Behavior: Examples from Guide Dogs

    | Contributor(s):: Lucy Asher, Naomi D. Harvey, Martin Green, Gary C. W. England

    Epidemiology is the study of patterns of health-related states or events in populations. Statistical models developed for epidemiology could be usefully applied to behavioral states or events. The aim of this study is to present the application of epidemiological statistics to understand animal...

  16. Comparing the Effect of Animal-Rearing Education in Japan with Conventional Animal-Assisted Education

    | Contributor(s):: Yuka Nakajima

    An increasing number of teachers are introducing animals into their class so that pupils foster cognitive, physiological, and social skills through their interaction with animals. Along with such an educational style termed animal-assisted education (AAE), Japanese formal education has also...

  17. Rabies Vaccination Targets for Stray Dog Populations

    | Contributor(s):: Tiffany Leung, Stephen A. Davis

    The role of stray dogs in the persistence of domestic dog rabies, and whether removal of such dogs is beneficial, remains contentious issues for control programs seeking to eliminate rabies. While a community might reach the WHO vaccination target of 70% for dogs that can be handled, the stray or...

  18. Real-Time Detection of a Virus Using Detection Dogs

    | Contributor(s):: T. Craig Angle, Thomas Passler, Paul L. Waggoner, Terrence D. Fischer, Bart Rogers, Patricia K. Galik, Herris S. Maxwell

    Viral infections are ubiquitous in humans, animals, and plants. Real-time methods to identify viral infections are limited and do not exist for use in harsh or resource-constrained environments. Previous research identified that tissues produce unique volatile organic compounds (VOC) and...

  19. The Role of Dog Population Management in Rabies Elimination—A Review of Current Approaches and Future Opportunities

    | Contributor(s):: Louise H. Taylor, Ryan M. Wallace, Deepashree Balaram, Joann M. Lindenmayer, Douglas C. Eckery, Beryl Mutonono-Watkiss, Ellie Parravani, Louis H. Nel

    Free-roaming dogs and rabies transmission are integrally linked across many low-income countries, and large unmanaged dog populations can be daunting to rabies control program planners. Dog population management (DPM) is a multifaceted concept that aims to improve the health and well-being of...

  20. Evaluation of Three Hydration Strategies in Detection Dogs Working in a Hot Environment

    | Contributor(s):: Cynthia M. Otto, Elizabeth Hare, Jess L. Nord, Shannon M. Palermo, Kathleen M. Kelsey, Tracy A. Darling, Kasey Schmidt, Destiny Coleman

    Physical activity in hot environments can increase the risk of heat stress or heat stroke in dogs. Heat tolerance is influenced by acclimatization to the environment, physical fitness, and hydration state. Three common strategies to promote hydration in working dogs are free access to water (W),...