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  1. Diet preference for grass and legumes in free-ranging domestic sheep and cattle: current theory and future application

    Contributor(s):: Rutter, S. M.

    This paper reviews the current theory and potential practical applications of research on the diet preference for grass and legumes in grazing domestic sheep and cattle. Although much of this work has focussed on grass and clover as a model system, it has wider theoretical implications and...

  2. Effects of varying feed provision on behavioral patterns of farmed collared peccary (Mammalia, Tayassuidae)

    Contributor(s):: Nogueira, S. S. C., Calazans, S. G., Costa, T. S. O., Peregrino, H., Nogueira-Filho, S. L. G.

    Feeding enrichment regime has been widely employed as an important tool to mimic foraging behavior and improve farm animals' welfare. Some authors have argued that creating some level of uncertainty in the animals' environment is beneficial. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of challenge...

  3. Behavioural and corticosterone responses to capture and confinement of wild blackbirds ( Turdus merula )

    Contributor(s):: Adams, N. J., Farnworth, M. J., Rickett, J., Parker, K. A., Cockrem, J. F.

    Capture and temporary confinement of wild birds are integral parts of wildlife management practice and research used, for example, during translocation or reintroduction initiatives. We report here on the behavioural and stress hormone (corticosterone) responses of wild blackbirds (Turdus merula)...

  4. Review of wallowing in pigs: description of the behaviour and its motivational basis

    Contributor(s):: Bracke, M. B. M.

    Wallowing, i.e. coating the body surface with mud, is a natural behaviour of pigs, commonly observed in feral pigs and wild boar, but rarely provided for in current housing systems for domestic pigs. Furthermore, in welfare science the subject has not been receiving much attention. This paper...

  5. Stress response of working African elephants to transportation and safari adventures

    Contributor(s):: Millspaugh, T. T., Burke, T., Dyk, G. van, Slotow, R., Washburn, B. E., Woods, R. J.

    African elephants (Loxodonta africana) are intensively managed in southern Africa and are routinely translocated between reserves. Domesticated elephants are used for elephant-back safaris and interactions with guests. Understanding how elephants respond to such activities is critical because of...

  6. Individualistic herds: individual variation in herbivore foraging behavior and application to rangeland management

    Contributor(s):: Searle, K. R., Hunt, L. P., Gordon, I. J.

    Rangeland systems cover vast areas of the earth's surface containing great diversity of life, and contribute to the livelihoods and welfare of millions of people. The management of rangeland systems for ecological and commercial outcomes is driven by a need to understand how grazing animals...

  7. Adrenocorticotrophin-induced stress response in captive vicunas ( Vicugna vicugna ) in the Andes of Chile

    Contributor(s):: Bonacic, C., Macdonald, D. W., Villouta, G.

    The vicuna is mainly used in two ways: wild captured, shorn and returned to the wild; or wild captured and maintained in captivity as part of a programme of sustainable use in the Andes of South America. Farming of wild vicunas has hitherto involved no assessment of their welfare. In this study a...

  8. Body weight change as a measure of stress: a practical test

    Contributor(s):: McLaren, G. W., Mathews, F., Fell, R., Gelling, M., Macdonald, D. W.

    We report on the efficacy of body weight change as a measure of trapping and handling stress in two species of wild small mammal: bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) and wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus). We tested two hypotheses: (1) that weight change after capture and handling is related to the...

  9. Impact of trapping and handling on Leukocyte Coping Capacity in bank voles ( Clethrionomys glareolus ) and wood mice ( Apodemus sylvaticus )

    Contributor(s):: Gelling, M., McLaren, G. W., Mathews, F., Mian, R., Macdonald, D. W.

    Small mammals are routinely live-trapped and subsequently handled for a range of ecological and behavioural studies. Despite the techniques commonly employed being potentially stressful for the individual animals involved, it has hitherto been difficult to quantify the physiological impact. Here,...

  10. Song development in birds: the role of early experience and its potential effect on rehabilitation success

    Contributor(s):: Spencer, K. A., Harris, S., Baker, P. J., Cuthill, I. C.

    Environmental conditions during the early life stages of birds can have significant effects on the quality of sexual signals in adulthood, especially song, and these ultimately have consequences for breeding success and fitness. This has wide-ranging implications for the rehabilitation protocols...

  11. Stress in wild-caught Eurasian otters ( Lutra lutra ): effects of a long-acting neuroleptic and time in captivity

    Contributor(s):: Fernandez-Moran, J., Saavedra, D., Ruiz de la Torre, J. L., Manteca-Vilanova, X.

    As part of a translocation project, 28 Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra) were captured from the wild and transported to the Barcelona Zoo for veterinary evaluation, quarantine and intraperitoneal implantation of telemetry devices. Eleven animals were injected with the long-acting neuroleptic (LAN)...

  12. The effect of handling under anaesthetic on the recapture rate of wild ship rats ( Rattus rattus )

    Contributor(s):: Prout, D. M., King, C. M.

    This paper describes a two-part study of small predators in New Zealand forests. First, during 12 days of live-trapping, 31 wild ship rats were captured, tagged and released: 9 were handled while anaesthetised using halothane and 22 were handled while conscious using gloves. There was a...

  13. The effect of transport stress on neutrophil activation in wild badgers ( Meles meles )

    Contributor(s):: Montes, I., McLaren, G. W., Macdonald, D. W., Mian, R.

    Wild badgers (Meles meles) in Wytham woods, Oxfordshire, are routinely trapped, transported to a central field laboratory, studied and released as part of an on-going population study. These procedures have been carefully developed to minimize impact on the badgers' welfare; however they are...

  14. The physiological impact of wool-harvesting procedures in vicunas ( Vicugna vicugna )

    Contributor(s):: Bonacic, C., Macdonald, D. W.

    A current programme of wildlife utilization in the Andean region involves the capture of wild vicunas, their shearing, transport and, in some cases, captive farming. The effects of these interventions on the physiology, and thus welfare, of wild vicunas are unknown. As a first step to quantifying...

  15. Transport stress in roe deer ( Capreolus capreolus ): effect of a short-acting antipsychotic

    Contributor(s):: Montane, J., Marco, I., Lopez-Olvera, J., Manteca, X., Lavin, S.

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a short-acting antipsychotic (acepromazine) on the stress response to transport in roe deer (C. capreolus). 21 roe deer in France were submitted to a 9-h road journey in order to reintroduce and restock this species into Catalonia (northeastern...

  16. A Mesolithic aurochs kill site (La Montagnes, Senas, bouches-du-Rhone)

    Contributor(s):: Helmer, Daniel, Monchot, Herve

  17. Ethnoarchaeozoology on hide working: Study of two hideworkers households in Konso (Ethiopia)

    Contributor(s):: Lesur-Gebremariam, Josephine

  18. Macro- and micromorphological features of lifestyle differences in pigs and wild boar

    Contributor(s):: Mainland, Ingrid, Schutkowski, Holger, Thomson, Amy F.

  19. Sacrifice and domestication of cattle in ancient China under the later Shang dynasty (from about 1300 to 1046 B. C.)

    Contributor(s):: Li, Guoqiang

  20. Visualizing the seasonal round: A theoretical experiment with strontium isotope profiles in ovicaprine teeth

    Contributor(s):: Meiggs, David C.