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  1. The Influence of Animal-Assisted Psychotherapy on the Establishment of the Therapeutic Alliance with Maltreated Children in Residential Care

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: Nancy Parish-Plass

    Background: A large proportion of maltreated children carry their experiences as secrets into adulthood, leading to the continuation of the maltreatment, developmental trauma, and prevention of treatment. Many undiscovered maltreated children are referred to therapy due to behavioral and...

  2. Visiting Hooves

    Visiting Hooves wasfounded in 2015.Victoria L. Smithis Founder and President Each miniature horse or bunny has2  million dollar liability insurance and a health certificate from a veterinarian. Each miniature horse in the program has been...

  3. The impact of tickling rats on human-animal interactions and rat welfare

    Contributor(s):: Megan Renee LaFollette, Brianna N Gaskill (adviser)

    Rats initially fear humans which can lead to negative affect, poor welfare, and difficult handling. Also, modeling and measuring positive affect states in rats can pose an additional challenge. Heterospecific play, or “tickling,” is a handling habituation technique that mimics rat...

  4. ANIMAL-ASSISTED ACTIVITIES: Effects of Animals on Positive Emotional Display in Children in Inclusion Classrooms

    Contributor(s):: Katie Osborn, Gayatri Mazgaonkar

    Animals are commonly present in classrooms and may be an important tool in enhancing children’s experiences, especially in inclusion classrooms that provide integrative learning for both typically developing children and children with special needs. The purpose of this study was to...

  5. Tickling Rats: Differential Benefits for Pet Store Rats

    Contributor(s):: Whitney Blankenberger

    Animal welfare and the effects of the human-animal bond are becoming increasingly important to researchers and the public. Animal use in biomedical research is indispensable and inevitably creates stressful situations for the animals. One way to mediate this stress and improve rat welfare is by...

  6. Model-Based Reverse Translation Between Veterinary and Human Medicine: The One Health Initiative

    Contributor(s):: Benjamin Schneider, Violeta Balbas-Martinez, Albert E. Jergens, Inaki F. Troconiz

    There is growing concern about the limitations of rodent models with regard to recapitulation of human disease pathogenesis. Computational modeling of data from humans and animals sharing similar diseases provides an opportunity for parallel drug development in human and veterinary medicine....

  7. To Group or Not to Group? Good Practice for Housing Male Laboratory Mice

    Contributor(s):: Sarah Kappel, Penny Hawkins, Michael T. Mendl

    It is widely recommended to group-house male laboratory mice because they are ‘social animals’, but male mice do not naturally share territories and aggression can be a serious welfare problem. Even without aggression, not all animals within a group will be in a state of positive...

  8. The Human-Animal Interaction Scale: development and evaluation

    Contributor(s):: Fournier, A. K., Berry, T. D., Letson, E., Chanen, R.

    The purpose of this study was to develop the Human-Animal Interaction Scale (HAIS) and evaluate its reliability and validity. The HAIS is a 24-item self-report instrument designed to describe and quantify behaviors performed by humans and nonhuman animals during an episode of interaction (e.g.,...

  9. An assessment of community understanding of the Human Animal Conservancy Self-Insurance Scheme and the impact of human-wildlife conflicts : a case study from the Kwandu conservancy, north-east Namibia.

    Contributor(s):: Marthin Kaukaha Kasaona

    The research problem of this mini-dissertation involves the conflicts between human and wildlife populations and the trialing of ‘compensation’ payouts that are emerging as a critical test within the conservancy. Crop raiders such as elephants, buffaloes, hippopotamus, bush pigs and...

  10. Therapy Animal Coalition

    The mission of Therapy Animal Coalition, Inc. is to help grow the number of therapy animal teams volunteering in therapeutic, educational, and other special environments.  To accomplish this, we will:Educate the public on how to become a therapy animal teamFacilitate volunteer opportunities...

  11. ExNOTic: Should We Be Keeping Exotic Pets?

    Contributor(s):: Rachel A Grant, V Tamara Montrose, Alison P Wills

    There has been a recent trend towards keeping non-traditional companion animals, also known as exotic pets. These pets include parrots, reptiles, amphibians and rabbits, as well as small species of rodent such as degus and guinea pigs. Many of these exotic pet species are not domesticated, and...

  12. Effacing the human: Rachel Rosenthal, rats and shared creative agency

    Contributor(s):: Carrie Rohman

  13. An Investigation into the Relationship between Owner Knowledge, Diet, and Dental Disease in Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus)

    Contributor(s):: Rosemary Norman, Alison P. Wills

  14. Of Mice, Birds, and Men: The Mouse Ultrasonic Song System Has Some Features Similar to Humans and Song-Learning Birds

    Contributor(s):: Gustavo Arriaga, Eric P. Zhou, Erich D. Jarvis

    Humans and song-learning birds communicate acoustically using learned vocalizations. The characteristic features of this social communication behavior include vocal control by forebrain motor areas, a direct cortical projection to brainstem vocal motor neurons, and dependence on auditory feedback...

  15. Pet Behaviour Science | Open Access Journal

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: David Menor

    Pet Behaviour Science is a new open access journal, which publishes original papers relating to all aspects of the behaviour of pets, including their relationships with humans. As a multidisciplinary journal, Pet Behaviour Science welcomes submissions from the arts and humanities, behavioural and...

  16. Think Outside the Cage: Moving Towards New Understandings of Companion Rabbits

    Contributor(s):: Ruthann Drummond

    Rabbits are the third most common companion mammal in Western homes, and their popularity continues to rise. However, they are also one of the most broadly used animal resources around the world, commonly being bred for their food, their fur, and their utility as biological models in animal...

  17. Oestrus odours from rats and mares: behavioural responses of sexually naive and experienced rats to natural odours and odorants

    Contributor(s):: Nielsen, B. L., Jerome, N., Saint-Albin, A., Ouali, C., Rochut, S., Zins, E. L., Briant, C., Guettier, E., Reigner, F., Couty, I., Magistrini, M., Rampin, O.

    Three experiments were conducted to investigate if sexual experience affects the behavioural response of male rats to natural oestrus odours and constituent odorants. In the first experiment, 16 male Brown Norway rats were exposed before and after sexual training to four odours (1-hexanol (herb...

  18. Long-term effects of straw blocks in pens with finishing pigs and the interaction with boar type

    Contributor(s):: Bulens, A., Beirendonck, S. van, Thielen, J. van, Buys, N., Driessen, B.

    This study verified the effect of straw blocks on the behavior and growth of finishing pigs and possible interactions with the genetic background (boar type). A total of 359 finishing pigs, which were offspring from different boar types, were housed in gender-mixed pens with slatted floors. Half...

  19. The effects of metabolic cage housing and sex on cognitive bias expression in rats

    Contributor(s):: Barker, T. H., Howarth, G. S., Whittaker, A. L.

    The use of metabolic cages is established housing protocol in small-animal, gastrointestinal research. Physiological data, as primarily observed through secretions of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has shown that rodents housed in this manner experience an increased stress response. Few...

  20. Urban business attitudes regarding rodents, rodent control methods, and impact on wildlife

    Contributor(s):: Eva Arndt

    Birds of prey and carnivorous mammals feed on small birds, rodents and other small mammals. Humans perceive many of the prey animals of these predators as well as the predators themselves, as “pests”, and seek to control them. Control methods for these unwanted pests, particularly...