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  1. PETPOSITIVE

    The Malaysian Animal-Assisted Therapy for the Disabled and Elderly Association (Petpositive) is the first – and only – nationally registered non-profit Society in the country which uses animals to empower the lives of disabled and elderly persons. We work with all pets. We reach out...

  2. A Quantitative Prioritisation of Human and Domestic Animal Pathogens in Europe

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: K. Marie McIntyre, Christian Setzkorn, Philip J. Hepworth, Serge Morand, Andrew P. Morse, Matthew Baylis

    Disease or pathogen risk prioritisations aid understanding of infectious agent impact within surveillance or mitigation and biosecurity work, but take significant development. Previous work has shown the H-(Hirsch-)index as an alternative proxy. We present a weighted risk analysis describing...

  3. Less common house pets

    Contributor(s):: Chomel, B. B., Schlossberg, D.

    This chapter focuses on the major health threats associated with exposure of humans to less common house pets. The viral, bacterial, parasitic and mycotic zoonoses transmitted by pet rabbits, rodents, reptiles, amphibians, ornamental aquarium fish, ferrets, bats and nonhuman primates are...

  4. Domestication effects on behavioural traits and learning performance: comparing wild cavies to guinea pigs

    Contributor(s):: Brust, V., Guenther, A.

    The domestication process leads to a change in behavioural traits, usually towards individuals that are less attentive to changes in their environment and less aggressive. Empirical evidence for a difference in cognitive performance, however, is scarce. Recently, a functional linkage between an...

  5. Evaluation of microwave energy as a humane stunning technique based on electroencephalography (EEG) of anaesthetised cattle

    Contributor(s):: Rault, J. L., Hemsworth, P. H., Cakebread, P. L., Mellor, D. J., Johnson, C. B.

    Humane slaughter implies that an animal experiences minimal pain and distress before it is killed. Stunning is commonly used to induce insensibility but can lead to variable results or be considered unsatisfactory by some religious groups. Microwave energy can induce insensibility in rats, and...

  6. Housing condition and nesting experience do not affect the Time to Integrate to Nest Test (TINT)

    Contributor(s):: Rock, M. L., Karas, A. Z., Gallo, M. S., Pritchett-Corning, K., Gaskill, B. N.

    Managing and assessing well-being in laboratory mice ( Mus musculus) is both challenging and necessary. Assessments intended to detect negative welfare states in mice are usually performed via observation of animals in the home cage, but a substantial amount of time and skill may be required to...

  7. Walking the dog: explorations and negotiations of species differences

    Contributor(s):: Erika Cudworth

    For Donna Haraway, everyday lives, experiences and observations of other species are crucial in helping us theorize animals. She insists that humans and dogs are both companion species, constituted in relation: ‚in those knots with actual animals and people looking back at each other‛. 2...

  8. Social Workers Advancing the Human-Animal Bond (SWAHAB)

    Social Workers Advancing the Human-Animal Bond (SWAHAB) began in 2004 as a group of New York City Social Workers and some members of other disciplines who recognized that the interaction of people and other animals affected the lives of both, often in profoundly important ways. This interaction...

  9. The Barn at Spring Brook Farm

    The Barn at Spring Brook Farm sits on 13 acres of open space including green pastures, gardens, and nature trails. Our fully accessible Chester County bank barn was designed specifically to provide opportunities for children with disabilities, including Autism Spectrum Disorders, to participate...

  10. Companion Animals: A New Awareness

    Contributor(s):: Lee Carpenter, Loren A. Will

    Seemingly all of a sudden, animal companions are our partners in health! Not just as carcasses to be chipped and chunked, fileted and skewered to fill our gullet, or to be stripped, tanned, and polished to adorn our egos and provide treads. Rather now as seltzers and herbs to soothe man's...

  11. Human-Animal Trust as an Analog for Human-Robot Trust: A Review of Current Evidence

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: Deborah R. Billings, Kristin E. Schaefer, Jessie Y. C. Chen, Vivien Kocsis, Maria Barrera, Michelle Ferrer, Peter A. Hancock, Jacquelyn Cook

    Trust is an essential element required for effective human-robot teaming. Yet, experimental research examining human-robot trust in team interactions is at its infancy stage. Conducting empirical studies using live robots can be extremely difficult in terms of money, time, equipment...

  12. TheraPet, Inc.

    TheraPet, Inc is a a local organization of volunteers, working together to promote the valuable bond between people and animals (dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, etc. are welcome). Our main purpose is for animals and their owners to visit nursing homes, veterans' homes, rehabilitation...

  13. Genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii in animals and humans

    Contributor(s):: L. David Sibley, Asis Khan, James W. Ajioka, Benjamin M. Rosenthal

    Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most widespread parasites of domestic, wild, and companion animals, and it also commonly infects humans. Toxoplasma gondii has a complex life cycle. Sexual development occurs only in the cat gut, while asexual replication occurs in many vertebrate hosts. These...

  14. The Care of Pets Within Child Abusing Families

    Contributor(s):: Elizabeth DeViney, Jeffery Dickert, Randall Lockwood

    The treatment of animals was surveyed in 53 families in which child abuse had occurred. Patterns of pet ownership, attitudes towards pets and quality of veterinary care did not differ greatly from comparable data from the general public. However, abuse of pets by a family member had taken place...

  15. Plague: infections of companion animals and opportunities for intervention

    Contributor(s):: Oyston, Petra C. F., Williamson, Diane

  16. Perceptions among university students in Seville (Spain) of the rabbit as livestock and as a companion animal

    | Contributor(s):: González-Redondo, P., Contreras-Chacón, G. M.

  17. Animal housing and welfare: effects of housing conditions on body weight and cortisol in a medium-sized rodent ( Cavia aperea)

    | Contributor(s):: Schumann, K., Guenther, A., Jewgenow, K., Trillmich, F.

    Rodents are the most abundant experimental nonhuman animals and are commonly studied under standard laboratory housing conditions. As housing conditions affect animals' physiology and behavior, this study investigated the effects of indoor and outdoor housing conditions on body weight and...

  18. Animal welfare beyond the cage ... and beyond the evidence?

    | Contributor(s):: Blanchard, R. J.

    In "Laboratory Rodent Welfare: Thinking Outside the Cage," Balcombe (2010/this issue) suggests that laboratory cage housing is damaging to rats and mice because it does not meet their evolved needs and may damage their psychological and physical health. The article also indicates that larger and...

  19. Behavioral assessment of intermittent wheel running and individual housing in mice in the laboratory

    | Contributor(s):: Pham, T. M., Brene, S., Baumans, V.

    Physical cage enrichment - exercise devices for rodents in the laboratory - often includes running wheels. This study compared responses of mice in enriched physical and social conditions and in standard social conditions to wheel running, individual housing, and open-field test. The study...

  20. Cage size preference in rats in the laboratory

    | Contributor(s):: Patterson-Kane, E. G.

    The size of an enclosure is an integral part of how well it accommodates a nonhuman animal's welfare; however, most enrichment studies concentrate on modifying the area inside the enclosure rather than enlarging it. It has been suggested that rats have little need for more cage space, but there...