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Tags: Bacteria + pathogens

All Categories (1-20 of 58)

  1. Examining differences between homebound older adult pet owners and non-pet owners in depression, systemic inflammation, and executive function

    Contributor(s):: Branson, S., Boss, L., Cron, S., Kang, DuckHee

    Homebound older adults are prone to depression, which is linked to systemic inflammation that promotes executive function decline. A companion animal may reduce the negative biobehavioral processes associated with depression, inflammation, and reduced executive function in homebound older adults....

  2. The associations between animal-based welfare measures and the presence of indicators of food safety in finishing pigs

    Contributor(s):: Alpigiani, I., Bacci, C., Keeling, L. J., Salman, M. D., Brindani, F., Pongolini, S., Hitchens, P. L., Bonardi, S.

    Stressful housing and management practices affect animals, potentially increasing their receptiveness to pathogens. Since some pathogens do not lead to clinical signs of sickness, subclinical pigs could enter the food-chain, contaminating carcases and offal at slaughter, representing a threat to...

  3. Welfare effects of a disease eradication programme for dairy goats

    Contributor(s):: Muri, K., Leine, N., Valle, P. S.

    The Norwegian dairy goat industry has largely succeeded in controlling caprine arthritis encephalitis (CAE), caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) and paratuberculosis through a voluntary disease eradication programme called Healthier Goats (HG). The aim of this study was to apply an on-farm welfare...

  4. Zoonotic importance of dermatophytosis in dogs and cats

    Contributor(s):: Cindy Paola Cruz Alcala

    Dermatophytoses are infections caused by dermatophyte fungi of the genus Microsporum, Epidermophyton and Trichophyton, which affect the keratinized tissues of the skin, hair and nails. Dermatophytosis in canines and felines are frequent pathologies that constitute an important mycosis in these...

  5. Welfare effects of a disease eradication programme for dairy goats

    Contributor(s):: Muri, K., Leine, N., Valle, P. S.

    The Norwegian dairy goat industry has largely succeeded in controlling caprine arthritis encephalitis (CAE), caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) and paratuberculosis through a voluntary disease eradication programme called Healthier Goats (HG). The aim of this study was to apply an on-farm welfare...

  6. Examining differences between homebound older adult pet owners and non-pet owners in depression, systemic inflammation, and executive function

    Contributor(s):: Branson, S., Boss, L., Cron, S., Kang, DuckHee

    Homebound older adults are prone to depression, which is linked to systemic inflammation that promotes executive function decline. A companion animal may reduce the negative biobehavioral processes associated with depression, inflammation, and reduced executive function in homebound older adults....

  7. On the role of pets in GermanyZur Rolle von Kleintieren in Deutschland

    Contributor(s):: Schwarz, S.

    This article discusses the number and presence of pets in the German household, especially dogs and cats; essentiality and importance of pets to the well-being of German owners; ability of pets to decrease the risk of heart disease; and function of dogs in rescue, animal assisted therapy and...

  8. Examining differences between homebound older adult pet owners and non-pet owners in depression, systemic inflammation, and executive function

    Contributor(s):: Branson, S., Boss, L., Cron, S., Kang, DuckHee

    Homebound older adults are prone to depression, which is linked to systemic inflammation that promotes executive function decline. A companion animal may reduce the negative biobehavioral processes associated with depression, inflammation, and reduced executive function in homebound older adults....

  9. Emerging and re-emerging zoonoses of dogs and cats

    Contributor(s):: Chomel, B. B.

    Since the middle of the 20th century, pets are more frequently considered as "family members" within households. However, cats and dogs still can be a source of human infection by various zoonotic pathogens. Among emerging or re-emerging zoonoses, viral diseases, such as rabies (mainly from dog...

  10. Quantitative assessment of human and pet exposure to Salmonella associated with dry pet foods

    Contributor(s):: Lambertini, E., Buchanan, R. L., Narrod, C., Ford, R. M., Baker, R. C., Pradhan, A. K.

    Recent Salmonella outbreaks associated with dry pet foods and treats highlight the importance of these foods as previously overlooked exposure vehicles for both pets and humans. In the last decade efforts have been made to raise the safety of this class of products, for instance by upgrading...

  11. Prevalence of zoonotic agents in dogs visiting hospitalized people in Ontario: implications for infection control

    Contributor(s):: Lefebvre, S. L., Waltner-Toews, D., Peregrine, A. S., Reid-Smith, R., Hodge, L., Arroyo, L. G., Weese, J. S.

  12. Effectiveness of animal health and welfare planning in dairy herds: a review

    Contributor(s):: Tremetsberger, L., Winckler, C.

    Maintaining and promoting animal health and welfare are important but challenging goals in livestock farming. Animal health and welfare planning aims to contribute to improvements in the herd through interventions in a structured way. This review provides an overview of current scientific...

  13. Pasteurella species peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis: household pets as a risk factor

    Contributor(s):: Poliquin, P. G., Lagace-Wiens, P., Verrelli, M., Allen, D. W., Embil, J. M.

    BACKGROUND: Pasteurella species are Gram-negative coccobacilli that are a part of the normal oropharyngeal flora of numerous domestic animals. They have been recognized as a rare but significant cause of peritonitis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). A consensus about management...

  14. Around cats

    Contributor(s):: Goldstein, E. J. C., Greene, C. E., Schlossberg, D.

    This chapter focuses on diseases transmitted from cats to humans. The diseases transmitted by inhalation (bordetellosis, plague and Q fever), vectors (ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, cat scratch disease, bacillary angiomatosis, flea-borne spotted fever, murine typhus and leishmaniasis), faecal-oral...

  15. Less common house pets

    Contributor(s):: Chomel, B. B., Schlossberg, D.

    This chapter focuses on the major health threats associated with exposure of humans to less common house pets. The viral, bacterial, parasitic and mycotic zoonoses transmitted by pet rabbits, rodents, reptiles, amphibians, ornamental aquarium fish, ferrets, bats and nonhuman primates are...

  16. With man's best friend

    Contributor(s):: Collins, J. M., Lorber, B., Schlossberg, D.

    This chapter focuses on human diseases associated with exposure to dogs. The epidemiology of local infections following dog bites, as well as the initial bite management, antibiotic prophylaxis, antibiotic treatment of infection, and prevention of dog bites are discussed. The life-threatening...

  17. Historical Zoonoses and Other Changes in Host Tropism of Staphylococcus aureus, Identified by Phylogenetic Analysis of a Population Dataset

    Contributor(s):: Marcus A Shepheard, Vicki M. Fleming, Thomas R Connor, Jukka Corander, Edward J. Feil, Christophe Fraser, William P. Hanage

    Staphylococcus aureus exhibits tropisms to many distinct animal hosts. While spillover events can occur wherever there is an interface between host species, changes in host tropism only occur with the establishment of sustained transmission in the new host species, leading to clonal expansion....

  18. Plague: infections of companion animals and opportunities for intervention

    Contributor(s):: Oyston, Petra C. F., Williamson, Diane

  19. Prevalence and antimicrogram of Staphylococcus intermedius group isolates from veterinary staff, companion animals, and the environment in veterinary hospitals in Korea

    Contributor(s):: Youn, JungHo, Yoon, JangWon, Koo, HyeCheong, Lim, SukKyung, Park, YongHo

  20. Common and emerging infectious diseases in the animal shelter

    Contributor(s):: Pesavento, P. A., Murphy, B. G.

    The beneficial role that animal shelters play is unquestionable. An estimated 3 to 4 million animals are cared for or placed in homes each year, and most shelters promote public health and support responsible pet ownership. It is, nonetheless, inevitable that shelters are prime examples of...