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  1. Exposure to cats: update on risks for sensitization and allergic diseases

    Contributor(s):: Dharmage, S. C., Lodge, C. L., Matheson, M. C., Campbell, B., Lowe, A. J.

  2. Impact of rapid treatment of sheep lame with footrot on welfare and economics and farmer attitudes to lameness in sheep

    Contributor(s):: Green, L. E., Kaler, J., Wassink, G. J., King, E. M., Thomas, R. G.

  3. Measuring the success of a farm animal welfare education event

    Contributor(s):: Jamieson, J., Reiss, M. J., Allen, D., Asher, L., Wathes, C. M., Abeyesinghe, S. M.

  4. Feather damaging behaviour in parrots: a review with consideration of comparative aspects

    Contributor(s):: Zeeland, Y. R. A. van, Spruit, B. M., Rodenburg, T. B., Riedstra, B., Hierden, Y. M. van, Buitenhuis, B., Korte, S. M., Lumeij, J. T.

    Feather damaging behaviour (also referred to as feather picking or feather plucking) is a behavioural disorder that is frequently encountered in captive parrots. This disorder has many characteristics that are similar to trichotillomania, an impulse control disorder in humans. Unfortunately, to...

  5. Feather eating in layer pullets and its possible role in the aetiology of feather pecking damage

    Contributor(s):: McKeegan, D. E. F., Savory, C. J.

    Feather eating and its possible relationship with damaging pecking was examined in 144 pen-housed ISA Brown layer pullets. Collection and measurement of loose feathers in sample plots on 12 pen floors (feather were characterized as 'short' or 'long'), and examination of faecal droppings (eaten...

  6. AIDS, canines and zoonoses: risks and benefits of visits

    Contributor(s):: Evans, K. M.

  7. Muscle disorders and rehabilitation in canine athletes. (Neuromuscular diseases)

    Contributor(s):: Steiss, J. E.

  8. Stereotypies and compulsive behaviours - causes and possibilities of prevention

    Contributor(s):: Kuhne, F.

    Despite the fact that livestock animals like companion pets have adapted through domestication to a life with human beings, they have the same demands on their environment as their feral conspecifics. Therefore, animal husbandry means keeping animals under conditions which are appropriate to the...

  9. Special Issue: One health: the intersection of humans, animals, and the environment. (Special Issue: One health: the intersection of humans, animals, and the environment.)

    Contributor(s):: Monath, T. P., Kahn, L. H., Kaplan, B.

    This special issue contains articles on the use of animal-assisted therapy for humans, zoonoses and disease control in domestic, laboratory and wild animals.

  10. Crib-biting behavior in horses: a review

    Contributor(s):: Wickens, C. L., Heleski, C. R.

    During the past decade, stereotypic behavior in horses, specifically crib-biting behavior, has received considerable attention in the scientific literature. Epidemiological and experimental studies designed to investigate crib-biting behavior have provided valuable insight into the prevalence,...

  11. The relationship between childhood cruelty to animals and psychological adjustment: a Malaysian study

    Contributor(s):: Mellor, D., Yeow, J., Norul Hidayah bt, Mamat, Noor Fizlee bt Mohd, Hapidzal

    In Western research, cruelty to animals in childhood has been associated with comorbid conduct problems and with interpersonal violence in later life. However, there is little understanding of the aetiology of cruelty to animals, and what in the child's life may require attention if the chain...

  12. A survey assessment of the incidence of fur-chewing in commercial chinchilla ( Chinchilla lanigera ) farms

    Contributor(s):: Ponzio, M. F., Busso, J. M., Ruiz, R. D., Cuneo, F. M. de

    Chinchilla lanigera intensive breeding programmes are affected by an abnormal repetitive behaviour called 'fur-chewing', yet the aetiology is still unknown and little scientific work has been published on this condition. Recent studies have supported the idea that fur-chewing is a stress-related...