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  1. Human-animal studies, G.H. Mead, and the question of animal minds

    Contributor(s):: Gallagher, T. J.

    In the field of human-animal studies (HAS), also known as anthrozoology, the question of nonhuman animal minds is central. During the first three decades of the 20th century, the social psychological G.H. Mead was among the first to take an explicitly contemporary approach to the question of mind...

  2. Dog breed differences in visual communication with humans

    Contributor(s):: Konno, A., Romero, T., Inoue-Murayama, M., Saito, A., Hasegawa, T.

    Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) have developed a close relationship with humans through the process of domestication. In human-dog interactions, eye contact is a key element of relationship initiation and maintenance. Previous studies have suggested that canine ability to produce human-directed...

  3. Living with the beast: wolves and humans through Portuguese literature

    Contributor(s):: Lopes-Fernandes, M., Soares, F., Frazao-Moreira, A., Queiroz, A. I.

    This paper explores representations of wolves in Portuguese literature using an anthropological framework to analyze perceptions, beliefs, knowledge, and practices. From a literary corpus compilation, 262 excerpts from 68 works that made reference to wolves were classified by grid analysis into...

  4. Living with the beast: wolves and humans through Portuguese literature

    Contributor(s):: Lopes-Fernandes, M., Soares, F., Frazao-Moreira, A., Queiroz, A. I.

    This paper explores representations of wolves in Portuguese literature using an anthropological framework to analyze perceptions, beliefs, knowledge, and practices. From a literary corpus compilation, 262 excerpts from 68 works that made reference to wolves were classified by grid analysis into...

  5. Visual attention and facial identification in human and non-human animals

    Contributor(s):: Guo, Kun, Freund, Lisa S., McCune, Sandra, Esposito, Layla, Gee, Nancy R., McCardle, Peggy

  6. Living with the beast: wolves and humans through Portuguese literature

    Contributor(s):: Lopes-Fernandes, M., Soares, F., Frazao-Moreira, A., Queiroz, A. I.

    This paper explores representations of wolves in Portuguese literature using an anthropological framework to analyze perceptions, beliefs, knowledge, and practices. From a literary corpus compilation, 262 excerpts from 68 works that made reference to wolves were classified by grid analysis into...

  7. Animals do have an interest in liberty

    Contributor(s):: Giroux, V.

    According to Alasdair Cochrane, liberty can have value for most animals only because it allows them to obtain other desirable things, such as well-being. With this he concludes that humans can continue to use other animals as long as they treat them well. In this article, I reject this conclusion...

  8. Human-domestic animal interactions

    Contributor(s):: Broom, D. M., Fraser, A. F.

  9. Human-domestic animal interactions

    Contributor(s):: Broom, D. M., Fraser, A. F.

  10. What makes a crime?: the perceived harmfulness, wrongfulness, and seriousness of offenses against nonhuman animals

    Contributor(s):: Wagner, K., Owen, S., Burke, T. W.

    The purpose of this research was to explore the perceived seriousness of crimes, such as abuse and neglect, committed against nonhuman animals. Drawing upon the methods of previous work on crime seriousness, it was hypothesized that perceptions of the harmfulness and wrongfulness of animal...

  11. What can inactivity (in its various forms) reveal about affective states in non-human animals? A review

    Contributor(s):: Fureix, C., Meagher, R. K.

    Captive/domestic animals are often described as inactive, with the implicit or explicit implication that this high level of inactivity is a welfare problem. Conversely, not being inactive enough may also indicate or cause poor welfare. In humans, too much inactivity can certainly be associated...

  12. Converging on ancient bones: a review of the evidence for the close relatedness of humans ( Homo sapiens) and spotted hyenas ( Crocuta crocuta)

    Contributor(s):: Baynes-Rock, M.

    The majority of spotted hyena studies are conducted in places such as national parks and reserves where there are few humans present other than the researchers. I argue that this reflects a perception that "real" hyenas are those largely unaffected by contact with humans. This is at odds with...

  13. Evaluation of an innovative approach for sensory enrichment in zoos: semiochemical stimulation for captive lions ( Panthera leo)

    Contributor(s):: Martinez-Macipe, M., Lafont-Lecuelle, C., Manteca, X., Pageat, P., Cozzi, A.

    Despite improvements in zoo housing and management conditions over the last years, zoo animals may still present undesirable behaviours, such as aggression, stereotypies, boredom and a general absence of natural behaviours. In order to improve animal welfare, researchers are constantly looking...

  14. Ameliorating nonhuman animals' lives: Erin McKenna's pets, people, and pragmatism

    Contributor(s):: Palop, L. de T.

    This review article discusses Erin McKenna's pragmatist theory concerning the ethical treatment of companion animals, which she lays out in Pets, People and Pragmatism. McKenna develops a middle-ground view between the two opposite positions that frame the current debate on companion animals,...

  15. Farm animal welfare and children: a preliminary study building an attitude scale and evaluating an intervention

    Contributor(s):: Lakestani, N., Aguirre, V., Orihuela, A.

    Children are future consumers; they will impact future animal welfare standards. This pilot study evaluated a nonhuman animal welfare education program, building a farm animal attitude questionnaire for 8- to 10-year-old children. The educational material focused on the behaviors and needs of...

  16. Recreational horse welfare: the relationships between recreational horse owner attributes and recreational horse welfare

    Contributor(s):: Hemsworth, L. M., Jongman, E., Coleman, G. J.

    In recent years the welfare of recreational horses has become an increasingly important issue, as evident by their high representation in welfare investigations around the world, however, little is known about the welfare of horses used in this capacity. The scientific literature concerning...

  17. Response to "Vulnerability, Dependence, and Special Obligations to Domesticated Animals" by Elijah Weber

    Contributor(s):: Palmer, C.

    This paper responds to Elijah Weber's "Vulnerability, Dependence, and Special Obligations to Domesticated Animals: A Reply to Palmer". Weber's paper develops significant objections to the account of special obligations I developed in my book Animal Ethics in Context (Columbia University Press,...

  18. Traversing the gap between religion and animal rights: framing and networks as a conceptual bridge

    Contributor(s):: Austin, R. L., Flynn, C. P.

    Historically, Judeo-Christian doctrine has been used to justify the mistreatment of nonhuman animals through the "dominion" view of human superiority. Linzey and others have questioned this perspective, suggesting that critical tenets of religion, and particularly Christianity, support the...

  19. Vulnerability, dependence, and special obligations to domesticated animals: a reply to Palmer

    Contributor(s):: Weber, E.

    Clare Palmer has recently argued that most humans have special obligations to assist domesticated animals, because domestication creates vulnerable, dependent individuals, and most humans benefit from the institution of domestication. I argue that Palmer has given us no grounds for accepting this...

  20. The anthropozoology of domestication for milk productionAnthropozoologie de la domestication laitiere

    Contributor(s):: Poplin, F.

    Milk draws its substance from a living being of flesh and blood and from plant matter full of scents, through a two-cycle digestive system and fermentation in vivo, that of ruminants, which are also animals that provide meat ("you drink my milk, you eat my meat"). The pig, the "outlaw" of...