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Tags: pollution + Mammals

All Categories (1-18 of 18)

  1. Potential Role of Pet Cats As a Sentinel Species for Human Exposure to Flame Retardants

    Contributor(s):: Luis A. Henríquez-Hernández, Elena Carretón, María Camacho, José Alberto Montoya-Alonso, Luis D. Boada, Verónica Bernal Martín, Yaiza Falcón Cordón, Soraya Falcón Cordón, Manuel Zumbado, Octavio P. Luzardo

    Flame retardants are a wide group of chemicals used by the industry to avoid combustion of materials. These substances are commonly found in plastics, electronic equipment, fabrics, and in many other everyday articles. Subsequently, ubiquitous environmental contamination by these common chemical...

  2. An Alternative Approach for Investigating the Carcinogenicity of Indoor Air Pollution: Pets as Sentinels of Environmental Cancer Risk

    Contributor(s):: John A. Bukowski, Daniel Wartenberg

    Traditionally, the cancer risks associated with radon, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), and similar indoor residential exposures have been evaluated through either laboratory experiments in rodents or epidemiology studies in people. Laboratory studies have the advantage of being controlled...

  3. A survey of chimpanzees ( Pan troglodytes troglodytes ) and gorillas ( Gorilla gorilla gorilla ) in the selectively logged Ngotto Forest, Central African Republic

    Contributor(s):: Hicks, T. C., Fouts, R. S., Fouts, D. H.

    Currently, the timber company Industrie Forestiere du Batalimo is selectively logging the Ngotto Forest in the Central African Republic. The forest is home to a population of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) and gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and provides the Bofi-speaking people of...

  4. Zoo visitor effect on mammal behaviour: does noise matter?

    Contributor(s):: Quadros, S., Goulart, V. D. L., Passos, L., Vecci, M. A. M., Young, R. J.

    The zoo visitor effect is the change in animal behaviour and physiology in response to the presence of a viewing public. It is thought to result from, amongst other things, visitor generated sound (i.e., noise), but this hypothesis has never been explicitly tested. We tested this hypothesis...

  5. Behaviour of laboratory mice is altered by light pollution within the housing environment

    Contributor(s):: Bedrosian, T. A., Vaughn, C. A., Weil, Z. M., Nelson, R. J.

  6. Rating harms to wildlife: a survey showing convergence between conservation and animal welfare views

    Contributor(s):: Dubois, S., Fraser, D.

  7. Environmental risks of pesticides versus genetic engineering for agricultural pest control

    Contributor(s):: Paoletti, M. G., Pimentel, D.

    This paper discusses the environmental risks of pesticides as compared to the risks associated with the application of genetic engineering and biotechnology in agricultural pest, plant pathogen and weed control. It is suggested that in terms of environmental and public health impacts, pesticides...

  8. Dog Ownership Enhances Symptomatic Responses to Air Pollution in Children with Asthma

    Contributor(s):: McConnell, Rob, Berhane, Kiros, Molitor, Jassy, Gilliland, Frank, Kuenzli, Nino, Thorne, Peter, Thomas, Duncan, Gauderman, WJames, Avol, Edward, Lurmann, Fred, Rappaport, Edward, Jerrett, Michael, Peters, John

  9. Acute and chronic exposure to ammonia and olfactory acuity for n -butanol in the pig

    Contributor(s):: Jones, J. B., Wathes, C. M., Persaud, K. C., White, R. P., Jones, R. B.

    An associative learning method (using a food reward) was developed to measure pigs' olfactory acuity for n-butanol, a standard odourant in human olfactometry. Six of 8 intact Duroc x Landrace crossbred male pigs were used for the study. The pigs could press two operant paddles but it only...

  10. Pain issues in poultry. (Special Issue: Pain in farm animals.)

    Contributor(s):: Gentle, M. J.

    This review highlights the possible pain experienced by layer and broiler poultry in modern husbandry conditions. Receptors which respond to noxous stimulation (nociceptors) have been identified and physiologically characterised in many different part of the body of the chicken including the...

  11. Four types of activities that affect animals: implications for animal welfare science and animal ethics philosophy

    Contributor(s):: Fraser, D., MacRae, A. M.

    People affect animals through four broad types of activity: (1) people keep companion, farm, laboratory and captive wild animals, often while using them for some purpose; (2) people cause deliberate harm to animals through activities such as slaughter, pest control, hunting, and toxicology...

  12. Amounts of pesticides reaching target pests: environmental impacts and ethics

    Contributor(s):: Pimentel, D.

    An examination of published work on arthropod pests, pathogens and weeds of crops indicated that less than 0.1% of pesticides applied for pest control reach their target pests. Thus, more than 99.9% of pesticides used move into the environment where they adversely affect public health and...

  13. Dogs a sentinels of human risk from environmental origin: interest for saturnim prevention; first study conducted in the Alfort French Veterinary School

    Contributor(s):: Enriquez, B., Hakou, G., Tabaries, A., Revol, B., Moal, J. le, Sasco, A., Benet, J. J.

    A study was carried out at the Alfort Veterinary School to apply the concept of sentinel animals to environmental toxicology, associated with pet epidemiology. The recruitment, with owners' consent, of adequate dogs (over 10 kg) in sufficient number, at the School's attending clinics has made it...

  14. The anti-social behaviour of urban dogs

    Contributor(s):: Loew, F. M., Fraser, A. F.

    Anti-social behaviour of urban dogs includes defaecation, biting, barking, street wandering, pack forming, exploring 'garbage' and public copulation. The authors discuss the use of ethology as a major tool in remedial action. They conclude that since heredity affects behaviour very considerably,...

  15. Aquaculture and restocking: implications for conservation and welfare. (Special Issue: Conservation and animal welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Braithwaite, V. A., Salvanes, A. G. V.

    As the harvesting of fish through commercial fisheries becomes both harder and less economically viable, the world is becoming increasingly dependent on aquaculture to provide fish for human consumption. The closely related activity of stock enhancement, whereby large numbers of fish are reared...

  16. Conservation and animal welfare issues arising from forestry practices. (Special Issue: Conservation and animal welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Blumstein, D. T.

    Forestry practices may directly kill animals as well as destroy and fragment their habitat. Even without habitat destruction, logging and its associated forest management practices (which include road building, re-forestation, and often increased recreational use) create noise, frighten animals,...

  17. Wild animal conservation and welfare in agricultural systems. (Special Issue: Conservation and animal welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Mathews, F.

    At least one-third of the land on earth is used for agricultural production and conflicts with the interests of wildlife are inevitable. These conflicts are likely to escalate as the human population expands and as the scale and intensity of agricultural production increases. This paper argues...

  18. Wildlife conservation and animal welfare: two sides of the same coin? (Special Issue: Conservation and animal welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Paquet, P. C., Darimont, C. T.

    Human activities deprive wild animals of their life requisites by destroying or impoverishing their surroundings, causing suffering of individuals. Yet, the notion that animal welfare applies to wildlife has escaped many animal welfarists and conservationists. A well-accepted and applied ethical...