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  1. Moving With Pets

    Contributor(s):: Dylan Kaarlsen

    When you go new places® every member of your family should be at ease. Cats, dogs and other animals are especially sensitive to moving. The secret to pet relocation is planning. Follow these pointers and ask your Atlas Agent if you have questions. This guide will help prepare you to move...

  2. The impact of tickling rats on human-animal interactions and rat welfare

    Contributor(s):: Megan Renee LaFollette, Brianna N Gaskill (adviser)

    Rats initially fear humans which can lead to negative affect, poor welfare, and difficult handling. Also, modeling and measuring positive affect states in rats can pose an additional challenge. Heterospecific play, or “tickling,” is a handling habituation technique that mimics rat...

  3. Tickling Rats: Differential Benefits for Pet Store Rats

    Contributor(s):: Whitney Blankenberger

    Animal welfare and the effects of the human-animal bond are becoming increasingly important to researchers and the public. Animal use in biomedical research is indispensable and inevitably creates stressful situations for the animals. One way to mediate this stress and improve rat welfare is by...

  4. To Group or Not to Group? Good Practice for Housing Male Laboratory Mice

    Contributor(s):: Sarah Kappel, Penny Hawkins, Michael T. Mendl

    It is widely recommended to group-house male laboratory mice because they are ‘social animals’, but male mice do not naturally share territories and aggression can be a serious welfare problem. Even without aggression, not all animals within a group will be in a state of positive...

  5. ExNOTic: Should We Be Keeping Exotic Pets?

    Contributor(s):: Rachel A Grant, V Tamara Montrose, Alison P Wills

    There has been a recent trend towards keeping non-traditional companion animals, also known as exotic pets. These pets include parrots, reptiles, amphibians and rabbits, as well as small species of rodent such as degus and guinea pigs. Many of these exotic pet species are not domesticated, and...

  6. An Investigation into the Relationship between Owner Knowledge, Diet, and Dental Disease in Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus)

    Contributor(s):: Rosemary Norman, Alison P. Wills

  7. Think Outside the Cage: Moving Towards New Understandings of Companion Rabbits

    Contributor(s):: Ruthann Drummond

    Rabbits are the third most common companion mammal in Western homes, and their popularity continues to rise. However, they are also one of the most broadly used animal resources around the world, commonly being bred for their food, their fur, and their utility as biological models in animal...

  8. Managing Utah Prairie Dogs on Private Lands

    Contributor(s):: S. Nicole Frey

    The Utah prairie dog is found only in Southern Utah. While beneficial to ecosystem health, the Utah prairie dog has historically been in conflict with agriculture and other human activities. This fact sheet describes recent changes to laws regarding Utah prairie dogs and new conservation programs...

  9. Certification in Animal Assisted Therapy and Animal Assisted Wellness

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: Eileen Bona

    This is a certification process in Alberta Canada that qualifies people to work with animals to help people in need.Certification is granted for two types of helping professionals as indicated below:Animal Assisted Therapist - Master’s level helping professionals. This includes mental...

  10. Exploring Animal-Assisted Interventions

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: Eileen Bona

    What does it involve? Practical application of the distance education information provided in the courses in Animal Assisted Interventions.Taking part in activities and exercises with animals designed to help people with a variety of life issues. These activities will address the learning...

  11. Introduction to Animal Assisted Therapy

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: Eileen Bona

    This 2 day workshop is intended for people who are interested in learning more about how animals can help people and what is involved in partnering with animals to do so.  What Does it Involve?  1. Advanced learning is provided prior to attendance at the workshop to become informed...

  12. Experimental control for the ovariectomized rat model: use of sham versus nonmanipulated animal

    Contributor(s):: Kruger, M. C., Morel, P. C. H.

    One of 2 models required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for registration of a treatment for osteoporosis, the ovariectomized (OVX) rat model, is widely used in scientific studies investigating sex hormone-deficient bone loss. The use of control nonhuman animals is critical because bone...

  13. Factors affecting the human attribution of emotions toward animals

    Contributor(s):: Wilkins, A. M., McCrae, L. S., McBride, E. A.

    Attribution of emotions to animals can affect human-animal interactions and dictate animal welfare laws. However, little is known about the factors that influence these attributions. We investigated the effect of belief in animal mind, pet ownership, emotional intelligence, eating orientation,...

  14. Evaluation of a novel rodenticide: acute sub-lethal effects of a methaemoglobin-inducing agent

    Contributor(s):: Quy, R. J., Gibson, T. J., Lambert, M. S., Eason, C. T., Gregory, N. G.

    In a series of experiments the welfare of para-aminovalerophenone (PAVP) sub-lethally poisoned rats ( Rattus norvegicus) was assessed. The experiments: (i) examined the acute methaemoglobin (MetHb) profile over time; (ii) refined the LD50 estimate for PAVP in adult female rats; (iii) developed...

  15. Evaluation of a novel rodenticide: welfare assessment of fatal methaemoglobinaemia in adult rats ( Rattus norvegicus)

    Contributor(s):: Gibson, T. J., Quy, R. J., Eason, C. T., Gregory, N. G.

    This study assessed the welfare of rats ( Rattus norvegicus) poisoned with a lethal dose of the methaemoglobin (MetHb) inducing compound para-aminovalerophenone (PAVP). Twenty rats were orally gavaged with either PAVP (treated) or the vehicle only (control). Spontaneous and evoked behaviours were...

  16. Stereotypic mice are aggressed by their cage-mates, and tend to be poor demonstrators in social learning tasks

    Contributor(s):: Harper, L., Choleris, E., Ervin, K., Fureix, C., Reynolds, K., Walker, M., Mason, G.

    Stereotypic behaviours (SBs) are linked with behavioural inflexibility and resemble symptoms of autism, suggesting that stereotypic animals could have autistic-like social impairments. SBs are also common in caged mice. We therefore hypothesised relationships between stereotypic and social...

  17. c 22 Animals for Research Act

  18. The Psychological Effects of Medical Research on Animal Subjects and the Ramifications for the Applicability of the Research Results

    Contributor(s):: Morgan A. Damm

    Historically, animals have been used in medical research to bring about many of the medical breakthroughs and advances seen today. The successful studies are accompanied by numerous, often concealed, failed studies that are inapplicable to human medicine due to stress and distress changing the...

  19. Antimony: The Use, Rights, and Regulation of Laboratory Animals

    Contributor(s):: Brenda L. Thomas

    'In recent years, the problem, plight, and philosophy behind the use of animals in laboratories, schools, and industries has caused many to formulate an opinion on animal experimentation. It is simple to postulate a Monday morning quarterback philosophy - merely weigh the...

  20. Laboratory Animal Act: A Legislative Proposal

    Contributor(s):: David Favre

    In one recent experiment, mongrel dogs were anesthetized after which thirty-five percent of their body was burned to the third degree by the application of a two hundred degree centigrade hot plate to their skin.' In 1983, researchers at the New Jersey Medical School...