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  1. Strength from Weakness: How Legalizing Sport Hunting of Endangered Species Could Provide the Conservation Effort Its Greatest Weapon

    Contributor(s):: Patrick Tubridy Smith

    Famed author and philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote “[o]ur strength grows out of our weaknesses”.1 Emerson’s belief that in recognizing weakness one becomes stronger echoes throughout human history. In the Book of Exodus, the Bible provides that during...

  2. Ethics and Wolf Management: Attitudes Toward and Tolerance of Wolves in Washington State

    Contributor(s):: Julie Callahan

    Approximately seventy-five years after extirpation from Washington State, gray wolves (Canis lupus) returned. As of December 2012, eight packs had arrived from adjacent states and provinces. Delisted from the Federal Endangered Species List in the eastern one-third of Washington, state wildlife...

  3. Post-occupancy Evaluation at the Zoo: Behavioral and Hormonal Indicators of Welfare in Orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus abelii)

    Contributor(s):: Leigha Tingey

    An increased understanding of species-specific behavioral needs has lead zoos to focus on providing more naturalistic and stimulating environments. Scientific assessments of how changes in habitat affect animal behavior are necessary in improving overall animal welfare. This study examined the...

  4. Wildlife Management of Canada Geese in New York State: A Departure from the Express Policies of New York's Environmental Conservation Law

    Contributor(s):: Loriann Vita

    Prolonged recreational hunting of Canada geese in New York State may be contributing to the degradation of the species and ecological damage throughout the state. Due to the recent significant changes in the resident and migratory populations of Canada geese throughout the Atlantic Flyway, a more...

  5. Assessment of wildlife value orientations, state agency credibility, and tolerance for mountain lions in Iowa

    Contributor(s):: Andrew L. Stephenson

    It is increasingly necessary for state agencies to incorporate the opinions of their constituents in wildlife management decision-making. Shifting demographics of Iowa's human population necessitate gathering information on stakeholders' beliefs and values toward wildlife. This project...

  6. Oct 17 2015

    The Wildlife Society Conference 2015

    For the first time in a decade, The Wildlife Society's Annual Conference is being held in Canada. Join us in Winnipeg, Manitoba from October 17-21, 2015 for a unique and memorable TWS experience...

    http://habricentral.org/events/details/383

  7. Australia to Kill 2 Million Feral Cats

    Forum › general-discussion › hcdiscussions

    Amid concerns about its growing feral cats population and its effects on other wildlife, Australia is planning to kill 2 million cats by 2020. The plan has drawn criticism from many, while others...

    http://habricentral.org/forum/general-discussion/hcdiscussions/541

  8. A Framework to Evaluate Wildlife Feeding in Research, Wildlife Management, Tourism and Recreation

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: Sara Dubois, David Fraser

    Feeding of wildlife occurs in the context of research, wildlife management, tourism and in opportunistic ways. A review of examples shows that although feeding is often motivated by good intentions, it can lead to problems of public safety and conservation and be detrimental to the welfare of the...

  9. Social Conflict and Human-Coyote Interactions in Suburban Denver

    Contributor(s):: Draheim, Megan M.

    In 2009, Greenwood Village and Centennial, Colorado (two bordering suburban towns south of Denver), passed coyote management plans in response to community concerns over human-coyote interactions. Although both plans are similar in many respects, theydiffer in some key ways, including...

  10. Making Space for Mexican Wolves: Technology, Knowledge and Conservation Politics

    Contributor(s):: Paula D. Decker

    The use of geospatial technologies, including radio telemetry, GPS collars, and mapping software, has proliferated in wildlife conservation. In addition to being tools for research, though, tracking devices are increasingly used to control animals that have been reintroduced to natural areas....

  11. Captivity for conservation? Zoos at a crossroads

    Contributor(s):: Keulartz, J.

    This paper illuminates a variety of issues that speak to the question of whether 'captivity for conservation' can be an ethically acceptable goal of the modern zoo. Reflecting on both theoretical disagreements (animal protectionists vs. wildlife conservationists) and practical challenges (the...

  12. Evidence for intensive walrus hunting by Thule Inuit, northwest Foxe Basin, Nunavut, Canada

    Contributor(s):: Desjardins, Sean R. A.

  13. Integrating Values and Ethics into Wildlife Policy and Management—Lessons from North America

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: Camilla H. Fox, Marc Bekoff

    Few animals provoke as wide a range of emotions as wolves. Some see wolves as icons of a lost wilderness; others see them as intruders. As the battle continues between wolf proponents and opponents, finding solutions that resolve conflicts while supporting the integrity of nature is challenging....

  14. From TEK to IQ: Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit and Inuit cultural ecology

    Contributor(s):: Wenzel, George W.

  15. Potential welfare impacts of kill-trapping European moles ( Talpa europaea) using scissor traps and duffus traps: a post mortem examination study

    Contributor(s):: Baker, S. E., Shaw, R. F., Atkinson, R. P. D., West, P., Macdonald, D. W.

    Moles are widely trapped as pests on farms and amenity land in Britain. Spring traps for killing mammals generally require welfare approval in the UK, but mole traps are exempt. Previous research demonstrated wide variation in the mechanical performance of mole traps. In this context, we aimed to...

  16. The Cayman Turtle Farm: why we can't have our green turtle and eat it too

    Contributor(s):: D'Cruze, N., Alcock, R., Donnelly, M.

    The Cayman Turtle Farm (CTF) is the only facility in the world that commercially produces green sea turtles ( Chelonia mydas) for human consumption. The CTF has operated at a significant financial loss for much of its 45 years history and is maintained by substantial Cayman Island Government...

  17. Bird-Watchers', Hunters', and Wildlife Professionals' Beliefs About the Importance and Management of Wildlife

    Contributor(s):: Daniel J. Witter

    Since the early 1930's, calls have been made for a uniting of hunters and nonhunters in support of wildlife conservation in the public sector. Today, however, such an alliance remains largely unfounded, with government wildlife agencies continuing to depend heavily on sportsmen for financial...

  18. Survival of bottlenose dolphin ( Tursiops sp.) calves at a wild dolphin provisioning program, Tangalooma, Australia

    Contributor(s):: Neil, D. T., Holmes, B. J.

    Mortality of calves born to provisioned mothers is identified in the literature as an issue of concern in dolphin provisioning programs. Wild dolphin provisioning at Tangalooma, Moreton Island, Australia has been occurring since 1992. Each evening, up to eight dolphins are provided with fish in a...

  19. Dogs and the Making of the American State: Voluntary Association, State Power, and the Politics of Animal Control in New York City, 1850–1920

    Contributor(s):: Wang, Jessica

  20. From Wild Lives to Wildlife and Back

    Contributor(s):: Benson, Etienne