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  1. University of Illinois School of Veterinary Medicine Wildlife Clinic

    Contributor(s):: Maci Oelschlager

    This semester, I was given the opportunity to be an undergraduate volunteer at the University of Illinois, School of Veterinary Medicine’s Wildlife Medical Clinic. I learned a lot by volunteering at the Wildlife clinic as well as gained a lot of hands on experience. Volunteering...

  2. Extinction Risk and Conservation of the World's Sharks and Rays

    Contributor(s):: Nicholas K. Dulvy, Sarah L. Fowler, John A. Musick, Rachel D. Cavanagh, Peter M. Kyne, Lucy R. Harrison, John K. Carlson, Lindsay N.K. Davidson, Sonja V. Fordham, Malcolm P. Francis, Caroline M. Pollock, Colin A. Simpfendorfer, George H. Burgess, Kent E. Carpenter, Leonard J.V. Compagno, David A. Ebert, Claudine Gibson, Michelle R. Heupel, Suzanne R. Livingstone, Jonnell C. Sanciangco, John D. Stevens, Sarah Valenti, William T. White

    The rapid expansion of human activities threatens ocean-wide biodiversity. Numerous marine animal populations have declined, yet it remains unclear whether these trends are symptomatic of a chronic accumulation of global marine extinction risk. We present the first systematic analysis of threat...

  3. Effects of Ocean Recreational Users on Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in the Santa Monica Bay, California

    Contributor(s):: Amber D. Fandel, Maddalena Bearzi, Taylor C. Cook

    Coastal bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) have been observed in proximity to swimmers, kayakers, stand-up paddle boarders and surfers along near-shore corridors in the Santa Monica Bay, California. From 1997 to 2012, a total of 220 coastal boat-based focal follows of dolphin schools were...

  4. A Hypothetical Engagement: GATT Article XX(a) and Indonesia's FATWA Against Trade in Endangered Species

    Contributor(s):: Lisa M. Meissner

    The greatest recognized threat facing biodiversity conservation today is habitat destruction. Other threats include but are not limited to global climate change, encroachment, illegal wildlife trafficking, and overexploitation through intensive agricultural and commercial uses. Although wildlife...

  5. Exemption Process under the Endangered Species Act: How the God Squad Works and Why

    Contributor(s):: des Rosiers

    Suppose the long-snouted ferret, native to the state of Jefferson, is nearing extinction. This species of ferret lives in the high plains region and can only survive in this environment. Only 1,000 breeding adults survive. Suppose further that the high plains of Jefferson are...

  6. The Role of Hybridization and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service Biologists' Discretion in the Implementation of the Endangered Species Act

    Contributor(s):: Jennifer F. Lind-riehl

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) requires that the “best available scientific and commercial data” be used to enable the protection of critically imperiled species from extinction and preserve biodiversity. However, the ESA does not provide specific guidance on how to apply this...

  7. The Risk of Extinction: A Risk Analysis of the Endangered Species Act as Compared to CITES

    Contributor(s):: David Favre

    Life for any individual is a series of risk assessments. The continued existence of a particular species depends on the sum total of the risks or rewards realized by the actions of each individual member plus the sum total of the risks or rewards imposed upon that species by...

  8. The African Elephant and The United States' Effect on The Survival of The Species

    Contributor(s):: Laurel Mcneill

    Initially, this paper will explore the major conditions affecting African elephant populations, the deleterious relationship between these animals and humans, and what is necessary to strike a balance for successful coexistence. The focus will then move towards an examination of the federal...

  9. Inmate experiences in wildlife rehabilitation

    Contributor(s):: Sorensen, Jill Kathleen

  10. Saving Animals, Saving the Future: John Linehan at TEDxYouth@BeaconStreet

    Contributor(s):: John Linehan

    The planet is losing species at alarming rates, and we must act now if we want to save those that teeter on the brink of extinction. From honeybees to rhinos, John Linehan, President and CEO of Zoo New England, has dedicated more than 30 years to protecting wildlife and educating people of all...

  11. Why We Need Zoos: Gabriela Mastromonaco at TEDxToronto

    Contributor(s):: Gabriela Mastromonaco

    There are various schools of thought surrounding zoos and their purpose. Skeptics argue that it’s unethical to remove wild animals from their natural habitat to be put on display, but proponents of zoos stress that they serve a critical scientific purpose. In this TEDxTalk, Dr. Gabriella...

  12. Dyan deNapoli: The great penguin rescue

    | Contributor(s):: Dyan deNapoli

    A personal story, a collective triumph: Dyan deNapoli tells the story of the world's largest volunteer animal rescue, which saved more than 40,000 penguins after an oil spill off the coast of South Africa. How does a job this big get done? Penguin by penguin by penguin ...

  13. Green Chimneys at Work (A How-to Manual)

    Full-text: Available

    Green Chimneys at Work (A How-to Manual) is set up as a collection of articles, answered questions, papers and anecdotes.  It does not have to be read from cover to cover.  The reader can open the manual at any point and begin reading.  Its purpose is to give the reader a solid,...

  14. Our Duties to Endangered Species

    | Contributor(s):: Holmes Rolston III

    Few persons doubt that we have obligations concerning endangered species, because persons are helped or hurt by the condition of their environment, which includes a wealth of wild species, currently under alarming threat of extinction. Whether humans have duties directly to endangered species is...

  15. Human-Wildlife Conflict Across Urbanization Gradients: Spatial, Social, and Ecological Factors

    | Contributor(s):: Amanda H. Gilleland

    As suburban and exurban residential developments continue to multiply in urban areas, they encroach on wildlife habitats leading to increased human-wildlife interactions. The animals involved in direct conflict with homeowners are often relocated or exterminated by the homeowners. Often the...

  16. Human Activity Differentially Redistributes Large Mammals in the Canadian Rockies National Parks

    | Contributor(s):: James Kimo Rogala, Mark Hebblewhite, Jesse Whittington, Cliff A. White, Jenny Coleshill, Marco Musiani

    National parks are important for conservation of species such as wolves (Canis lupus) and elk (Cervus canadensis). However, topography, vegetation conditions, and anthropogenic infrastructure within parks may limit available habitat. Human activity on trails and roads may lead to indirect habitat...

  17. Countering Brutality to Wildlife, Relationism and Ethics: Conservation, Welfare and the 'Ecoversity'

    | Contributor(s):: Steve Garlick, Julie Matthews, Jennifer Carter

    Wildlife objectification and cruelty are everyday aspects of Australian society that eschew values of human kindness, empathy, and an understanding of the uniqueness and importance of non-human life in the natural world. Fostered by institutional failure, greed and selfishness, and the worst...

  18. Rescue, Rehabilitation, and Release of Marine Mammals: An Analysis of Current Views and Practices

    | Contributor(s):: D. J. St. Aubin, J. R. Geraci, V. J. Lounsbury

    Stranded marine mammals have long attracted public attention. Those that wash up dead are, for all their value to science, seldom seen by the public as more than curiosities. Animals that are sick, injured, orphaned or abandoned ignite a different response. Generally, public sentiment supports...

  19. Proceedings of the Second Eastern Wildlife Damage Control Conference (Complete volume)

    | Contributor(s):: Peter T. Bromley (editor)

    The papers and abstracts of the proceedings were reproduced from camera-ready materials provided by the authors. The quality of the published proceedings is a credit to the authors, who followed editorial directions very well and who painstakingly reviewed their papers. The proceedings contains...

  20. Community-based monitoring of tigers in Nepal

    | Contributor(s):: Teri Allendorf, Bhim Gurung, J. L. David Smith

    Local citizens recruited and trained as bagh heralu (“tiger watchers”) helped us to collect information on the distribution of tiger throughout the Tarai of Nepal. While the ultimate goal of the bagh heralu program was to map the current metapopulation of tigers in Nepal and to determine extent...