The HABRI Foundation is calling for research proposals to investigate the health outcomes of pet ownership and/or animal-assisted activity or therapy, both for the people and the animals involved. To learn more, visit https://habri.org/grants/funding-opportunities/ close

HabriCentral will be intermittently unavailable due to scheduled maintenance on Tuesday, January 19, 2021 starting at 11am ET. There will be some downtime of site features during the maintenance period. Please plan accordingly and we do apologize for any inconvenience. close

 
You are here: Home / Journal Articles / Physiological and behavioural effects of handling and restraint in the ball python ( Python regius ) and the blue-tongued skink ( Tiliqua scincoides ) / About

Physiological and behavioural effects of handling and restraint in the ball python ( Python regius ) and the blue-tongued skink ( Tiliqua scincoides )

By M. D. Kreger, J. A. Mench

View Link (HTM)

Licensed under

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

Four handling techniques commonly used with snakes and lizards in zoological park reptile collections were evaluated with respect to animal well-being. Adult male blue-tongued skinks (n = 3) and ball pythons (n = 4) were either handled gently, restrained manually, or container restrained for 10 min. The animals were then released into their enclosures for 15 min and blood samples were taken. At each sampling period, one animal served as an unhandled control. Plasma corticosterone (CS) levels, pre and post-treatment locomotor and consummatory activities, and heterophil/lymphocyte ratios were determined. None of the parameters evaluated differed significantly among treatments with the exception of CS levels in container-restrained pythons (56.2 +or- 6.7 ng/ml), which were higher than those of controls (37.6 +or- 6.1 ng/ml). Brief periods of handling in captivity thus do not appear to cause chronic stress in the study species, although container restraint did appear to result in short term stress in pythons.

Date 1993
Publication Title Applied Animal Behaviour Science
Volume 38
Issue 3/4
Pages 323-336
ISBN/ISSN 0168-1591
Language English
Author Address Department of Poultry Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA.
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. Abnormal behavior
  2. Animal behavior
  3. Animal diseases
  4. Animal physiology
  5. Animal rights
  6. Animal welfare
  7. Blood
  8. Deviant behavior
  9. Glucocorticoids
  10. Handling
  11. Lizards
  12. Reptiles
  13. restraint
  14. Snakes
  15. Stress