You are here: Home / Journal Articles / Welfare implications of captive primate population management: behavioural and psycho-social effects of female-based contraception, oestrus and male removal in hamadryas baboons ( Papio hamadryas ). (Special issue: Primates in zoos) / About

Welfare implications of captive primate population management: behavioural and psycho-social effects of female-based contraception, oestrus and male removal in hamadryas baboons ( Papio hamadryas ). (Special issue: Primates in zoos)

By A. B. Plowman, N. R. Jordan, N. Anderson, E. Condon, O. Fraser

View Resource (HTM)

Licensed under

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

In response to overpopulation, management actions were taken over a 5-year period to reduce group size and slow the population growth rate of hamadryas baboons at Paignton Zoo Environmental Park. Management involved three planned removals of several individuals and implantation of all adult females with NorplantReg., a long-acting contraceptive, expected to be effective for 2-3 years. Possible psychosocial effects of these management strategies were monitored in adult males and females using the rate of occurrence of self-directed behaviour (SDB). SDB was more frequent in males than in females, and in both sexes was significantly more frequent in situations where greater social tension was expected. SDB rates were significantly correlated with overall group size, indicating that the managed reduction in group size was beneficial for the welfare of the remaining group members. Female agonistic interactions were significantly more frequent when they or another female in the harem were in oestrus. However, there was no detectable increase in the rate of SDB of males or females as a result of the contraceptive implants. Despite previous work showing that (a) NorplantReg. does not stop normal physical and behavioural signs of oestrus and (b) that female hamadryas baboons in oestrus tend to become more aggressive, our results suggest that implantation with NorplantReg. did not cause a substantial increase in social tension in the group as a whole. However, a small effect could have been masked by the simultaneous and greater effects of changing group size.

Date 2005
Publication Title Applied Animal Behaviour Science
Volume 90
Issue 2
Pages 155-165
ISBN/ISSN 0168-1591
DOI 10.1016/j.applanim.2004.08.014
Language English
Author Address Paignton Zoo Environmental Park, Totnes Road, Paignton, Devon, TQ4 7EU, UK. amy.plowman@paigntonzoo.org.uk
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. Agonistic behavior
  2. Animal behavior
  3. Animal physiology
  4. Animal rights
  5. Animal welfare
  6. Baboons
  7. Behavior and behavior mechanisms
  8. Birth
  9. Contraception
  10. Estrous cycle
  11. Group size
  12. Mammals
  13. Monkeys
  14. peer-reviewed
  15. population control
  16. population growth
  17. Primates
  18. psychosocial issues
  19. Zoo and captive wild animals
Badges
  1. peer-reviewed