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Socially induced diet preference ameliorates conditioned food aversion in lambs

By F. D. Provenza, E. A. Burritt

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Abstract

To determine whether a socially induced diet preference could ameliorate a conditioned food aversion in lambs one group was conditioned to avoid the shrub Cercocarpus montanus by giving them lithium chloride, a toxin that produces strong food aversions, following shrub ingestion. On day 1 of conditioning, lambs ingested an average of 29 bites of C. montanus, but by day 2 the number of bites had decreased to two and lambs took even fewer bites on days 3-5. Following conditioning, averted lambs spent a substantial amount of time foraging on C. montanus when foraging with non-averted conspecifics in pasture trials (10% vs. 19% of time spent ingesting C. montanu) and inpen trials (25 vs. 35 bites). The effects of group composition during conditioning (heterogeneous vs. homogeneous) on the use of C. montanus during pasture and pen trials were also examined. In the heterogeneous groups, lambs being averted to C. montanus were exposed to the shrub in the presence of lambs not being averted to C. montanus. In the homogeneous groups all lambs were averted to C. montanus. Lambs in the heterogeneous groups took numerically more bites of C. montanus than lambs in the homogeneous groups during conditioning (25 vs. 17 bites/day), but the trend was not significant. When foraging on pastures, however, lambs in the heterogeneous groups spent more time browsing C. montanus than lambs in the homogeneous groups during Trial 2 (11.4% vs. 3.7%), 3 (16.7% vs. 3.2%), and 4 (42.9% vs. 28.1%), but not during Trial 1 (7.6% vs. 3.9%). Lambs in the heterogeneous groups took numerically more bites of C. montanus than lambs in the homogeneous groups during a pen trial following the pasture trials (35 vs. 25 bites), but the trend was not significant. the capacity of social interactions to ameliorate food aversions suggests that social influences are a major determinant of diet selection in sheep.

Date 1991
Publication Title Applied Animal Behaviour Science
Volume 31
Issue 3-4
Pages 229-236
ISBN/ISSN 0168-1591
Language English
Author Address Range Science Department, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-5230, USA.
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Tags
  1. Animal behavior
  2. Animal nutrition
  3. Animal Toxicology Poisoning and Pharmacology
  4. Diets
  5. Feeding behavior
  6. Flowers
  7. Food preferences
  8. Lambs
  9. Mammals
  10. peer-reviewed
  11. Plants
  12. Sheep
  13. Social behavior
  14. social interactions
  15. taste
  16. Toxins and toxicants
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  1. peer-reviewed