The HABRI Foundation is calling for research proposals to investigate the health outcomes of pet ownership and/or animal-assisted activity or therapy, both for the people and the animals involved. To learn more, visit https://habri.org/grants/funding-opportunities/ close

 
You are here: Home / Journal Articles / Time budget-, behavioral synchrony- and body score development of a newly released Przewalski's horse group Equus ferus przewalskii , in the Great Gobi B strictly protected area in SW Mongolia / About

Time budget-, behavioral synchrony- and body score development of a newly released Przewalski's horse group Equus ferus przewalskii , in the Great Gobi B strictly protected area in SW Mongolia

By A. C. Souris, P. Kaczensky, R. Julliard, C. Walzer

View Resource (HTM)

Licensed under

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

The Przewalski's horse (Equus ferus przewalskii) became extinct in the wild in the 1960s, but survived as a species due to captive breeding. There have been several initiatives to re-introduce the species in central Asia, but until now only two projects in Mongolia establish free-ranging populations. Data on basic ecology and behavior of the species prior to extinction are largely lacking and thus a good documentation of the re-introduction process is essential. Between 13 May and 2 September 2003 we documented the time budget-, behavioral synchrony- and body score development of a newly released Przewalski's horse group in the Gobi area of SW Mongolia. Contrary to our expectations, the newly released Przewalski's horses did not show the expected succession of an exploration-, acclimatization-, and established phase. Grazing activity was very high after the release, decreased to a minimum in July and increased again towards the end of the study in September. Resting activity followed the opposite trend, whereas moving activity was more or less constant over the entire observation period. Behavioral synchronization of the group was high throughout the study period and immigration or emigration of members did not result in a de-synchronization of the group. The body score index never dropped, but rather increased for all group members. Our data suggests that captive bred Przewalski's horses experience little behavioral and nutritional stress when being released into the desert steppe of the Gobi regions after 1 year in an adaptation enclosure.

Date 2007
Publication Title Applied Animal Behaviour Science
Volume 107
Issue 3/4
Pages 307-321
ISBN/ISSN 0168-1591
Language English
Author Address University of Pierre and Marie CURIE, Paris, France. petra.kaczensky@wildlife.uni-freiburg.de
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. Acclimatization
  2. Animal behavior
  3. Animal physiology
  4. Asia
  5. Biological resources
  6. Conservation
  7. Developed countries
  8. Exploration
  9. Free range husbandry
  10. Grazing
  11. Horses
  12. Immigration
  13. Mammals
  14. Mongolia
  15. Movement
  16. Pasturing
  17. peer-reviewed
  18. rest
  19. Zoo and captive wild animals
Badges
  1. peer-reviewed