You are here: Home / Journal Articles / The effect of beak trimming on food intake, feeding behaviour and body weight in adult hens / About

The effect of beak trimming on food intake, feeding behaviour and body weight in adult hens

By M. J. Gentle, B. O. Hughes, R. C. Hubrecht

View Link (HTM)

Licensed under

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

Beak trimming in adult hens caused a temporary fall in food intake which was not followed by a compensatory hyperphagia, and body weight was reduced for at least 6 weeks. Removal of half the beak had more effect than removing one-third, and the consequences were greater when the hens were fed pellets rather than mash. Beak trimming reduced feeding efficiency (number of pecks per gram of pellets ingested) to only 20% of its preoperative value. The bird was either failing to grasp the pellet in its beak, or not transferring it to the pharynx where it could be swallowed. It could not adapt its stereotyped behaviour pattern to compensate for the altered beak shape. Pecking rate rose sharply after beak trimming, then declined to the pre-operative value after 3 weeks, indicating no decline in feeding motivation.

Date 1982
Publication Title Applied Animal Ethology
Volume 8
Issue 1/2
Pages 147-159
Language English
Author Address ARC Poult. Res. Centre, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9PS, UK.
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. Animal behavior
  2. Animal Treatment and Diagnosis (Non-Drug)
  3. Beak
  4. Birds
  5. Chickens
  6. Debeaking
  7. Deprivation
  8. Feeding behavior
  9. Fowls
  10. Nutritional disorders
  11. peer-reviewed
  12. Poultry
Badges
  1. peer-reviewed