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Ethnic variations in pet attachment among students at an American school of veterinary medicine

By S. E. Brown

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Abstract

This study explores ethnic variations in animal companion ("pet") attachment among 133 students enrolled in a school of veterinary medicine. The 57 White and 76 African American participants completed surveys that included background information, several questions about their animal companions, and a pet attachment questionnaire (PAQ).White students had signiŽcantly higher PAQ scores than did African American students (p<.001). White students also had signiŽcantly more pets (M=4.05 vs. 2.18, p<.001) and more kinds of pets (M=2.30 vs. 1.57, p<.001) and were more likely to allow pets to sleep on their beds (70% vs. 53%, p<.05). Although keeping pets is a universal cultural phenomenon, how that attachment is expressed may vary from culture- to-culture. This study explores possible explanations and implications for these variations.

Submitter

Megan Kendall

Purdue University

Date 2003
Publication Title Society and Animals
Volume 11
Issue 1
Pages 101-102
Publisher Brill
DOI 10.1163/156853002320770065
Language English
Notes This article is provided by Brill publishing house: http://www.brill.com/
Additional Language English
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Tags
  1. Africa
  2. Animal roles
  3. Animals in culture
  4. Attitudes
  5. Ethnicity
  6. Human-animal relationships
  7. Pet ownership
  8. Pets and companion animals
  9. Racial and Ethnic Groups
  10. Treatment of animals