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Interparental Conflict and Youth Maladjustment: The Buffering Effects of Pets

By Elizabeth B. Strand

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Abstract

Children who experience interparental conflict have more difficulty with internalizing and externalizing problems. Children's ability to manage their emotional and physiological arousal buffer them from the effects of interparental conflict. The child-pet bond is associated with emotional and physiological management, yet researchers have not explored the buffering effects of this relationship in the face of interparental conflict. This article reviews salient literature and presents implications for social work research and practice on this topic. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract)

Publication Title Stress, Trauma and Crisis: An International Journal
Volume 7
Issue 3
Pages 151-168
ISBN/ISSN 1543-46131543-4591
Publisher Taylor & Francis
DOI 10.1080/15434610490500071
Author Address Strand, Elizabeth B., University of Tennessee, College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Comparative Medicine 2407 River Drive, Room 205, Knoxville, TN, US, 37996-4543, estrand@utk.edu
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Tags
  1. Children
  2. Coping
  3. Emotions
  4. Family
  5. Interspecies interactions
  6. Marriage
  7. parents
  8. peer-reviewed
  9. Pets and companion animals
  10. physiology
  11. youth
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  1. peer-reviewed