You are here: Home / Journal Articles / Towards a more objective assessment of equine personality using behavioural and physiological observations from performance test training / About

Towards a more objective assessment of equine personality using behavioural and physiological observations from performance test training

By Uta König von Borstel, Stephanie Pasing, Matthias Gauly

View Resource (HTM)

Licensed under

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

Current definitions of horse personality traits are rather vague, lacking clear, universally accepted guidelines for evaluation in performance tests. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to screen behavioural and physiological measurements taken during riding for potential links with scores the same horses received in the official stallion performance test for rideability and personality traits. Behaviour, heart rate (HR) and HR variability from thirty-six stallions participating in a performance test were recorded repeatedly during their performance test training. Using the coefficient of determination, regression analysis revealed that about 1/3 of variation (ranging between r=0.26 (“constitution” (i.e. fitness, health)) and r=0.46 (rideability)) in the personality trait scores could be explained by selecting the three most influential behaviour patterns per trait. These behaviour patterns included stumbling (with all traits except character), head-tossing (temperament, rideability), tail-swishing (willingness to work), involuntary change in gait (character) and the rider's use of her/his hands (constitution, rideability), voice (temperament) or whip (constitution). Subsequent mixed model analysis revealed a significant (P

Publication Title Applied Animal Behaviour Science
Volume 135
Issue 4
Pages 277-285
ISBN/ISSN 0168-1591
DOI 10.1016/j.applanim.2011.10.007
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. Behavior and behavior mechanisms
  2. Heart rate
  3. Horses
  4. Personality
  5. Riding