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Development of a national companion animal syndromic surveillance system for bioterrorism

By G. E. Moore, M. P. Ward, J. Dhariwal, C. C. Wu, N. W. Glickman, H. B. Lewis, L. T. Glickman

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Abstract

A companion animal syndromic surveillance system has been established at Purdue University to augment national U.S. efforts in bioterrorism detection. This system analyses electronic data from a veterinary practice with 360 hospitals in 42 states. Using syndromic definitions for clinical disease caused by CDC Category A and B bioterrorism agents, dogs and cats with corresponding clinical signs can be identified as potential cases, and geospatial analysis of mapped owner addresses used for cluster detection.

Date 2004
Publication Title GISVET'04: second international conference on the applications of GIS and spatial analysis to veterinary science, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada, 23rd-25th June
Pages 9-11
ISBN/ISSN 1-8995-1323-X
Publisher Veterinary Laboratories Agency
Location of Publication Addlestone
Language English
Author Address Dept. of Veterinary Pathobiology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. gemoore@purdue.edu wardmp@purdue.edu
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Tags
  1. Animal roles
  2. Cats
  3. Clinical aspects
  4. Diseases
  5. Dogs
  6. Indiana
  7. Pets and companion animals
  8. terrorism
  9. veterinary practices