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Dog breeding in New Providence, The Bahamas, and its potential impact on the roaming dog population II: The fate of puppies

By W. J. Fielding

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Abstract

This article reports the first known study on the disposal of puppies in an Afro-Caribbean community. The study reported the fate of 2,427 puppies through 517 interviews with dog caregivers. The study reported that surviving puppies from "pure-bred" females were typically sold (60.1% of surviving puppies) whereas those from mongrel (potcakes) mothers were given away (48.4%). Pure-bred mothers produced the majority of surviving puppies (55.8%). Some caregivers failed to appreciate that the "stray dog problem" resulted from the inappropriate care of their dogs and disposal of puppies. Overall, the unstructured relinquishment (giving away) of puppies (22.7% of surviving puppies) could contribute to the roaming dog population unless they are cared for responsibly.

Publication Title Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science
Volume 13
Issue 4
Pages 300-313
ISBN/ISSN 1088-8705
Publisher Taylor & Francis
DOI 10.1080/10888705.2010.507122
Language English
Author Address Planning Department, The College of The Bahamas, Thompson Boulevard, P.O. Box N 4912, New Providence, Bahamas.wfru@hotmail.com
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Tags
  1. ACP Countries
  2. Animal rights
  3. Animals
  4. Animal welfare
  5. Bahamas
  6. Canidae
  7. Canine
  8. Caribbean
  9. Carnivores
  10. Commonwealth of Nations
  11. Developing countries
  12. Dogs
  13. interviews
  14. Islands
  15. Mammals
  16. mothers
  17. peer-reviewed
  18. Pets and companion animals
  19. United States of America
  20. vertebrates
  21. young animals
Badges
  1. peer-reviewed