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Interspecific interactions and welfare implications in mixed species communities of capuchin (Sapajus apella) and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) over 3 years

By Hannah M. Buchanan-Smith, Joana Griciute, Sophia Daoudi, Rebecca Leonardi, Andrew Whiten

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Abstract

Species have complex relationships with others in the wild, and some such as capuchin (Sapajus apella) and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) naturally choose to associate with each other. There are a number of benefits of exhibiting such species in correspondingly mixed communities in captivity to enhance welfare through increased social complexity, which is potentially environmentally enriching in restricted captive enclosures. Monitoring the interactions between species is critical, however, particularly when members of one species are considerably larger and potentially more aggressive than the other. We report on the frequency and nature of interspecific interactions between S. apella and S. sciureus during four time periods over 3 years (2008–2010) following the formation of two mixed species groups at the ‘Living Links to Human Evolution’ Research Centre in Edinburgh Zoo, Scotland. Both the rate and the distribution of interspecific interactions among aggressive, affiliative and neutral categories of behaviour varied over time (P

Publication Title Applied Animal Behaviour Science
Volume 147
Issue 3
Pages 324-333
ISBN/ISSN 0168-1591
DOI 10.1016/j.applanim.2013.04.004
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Tags
  1. Interactions
  2. mixed species
  3. Monkeys