You are here: Home / Journal Articles / A comparison of positive reinforcement training techniques in owl and squirrel monkeys: time required to train to reliability / About

A comparison of positive reinforcement training techniques in owl and squirrel monkeys: time required to train to reliability

By J. Rogge, K. Sherenco, R. Malling, E. Thiele, S. Lambeth, S. Schapiro, L. Williams

View Resource (HTM)

Licensed under

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

Positive reinforcement training (PRT) techniques enhance the psychological well being of nonhuman primates by increasing the animal's control over his or her environment and desensitizing the animal to stressful stimuli. However, the literature on PRT in neotropical primates is limited. Here PRT data from owl monkeys and squirrel monkeys are presented, including the length of time to train subjects to target, present hand, and present foot, important responses that can be used to aid in health inspection and treatment. A high percentage of the squirrel and owl monkeys were successfully trained on target and present hand. Present foot, a less natural response, was harder to train and maintain. Although squirrel monkeys did learn to target significantly faster than owl monkeys, the 2 genera did not differ on time to train on subsequent behavior. These data demonstrate that although owl monkeys may require slightly more time to acclimate to a PRT program, it is still possible to establish a PRT program with neotropical primates, and once animals have been introduced to the program, they can learn new responses in a relatively few short sessions.

Publication Title Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science
Volume 16
Issue 3
Pages 211-220
ISBN/ISSN 1088-8705
Publisher Taylor & Francis
DOI 10.1080/10888705.2013.798223
Language English
Author Address Department of Veterinary Sciences, Michale E. Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 650 Cool Water Drive, Bastrop, TX 78602, USA.welawrence@mdanderson.org
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. Animals
  2. Animal welfare
  3. Diseases and injuries of animals
  4. Education
  5. Feet
  6. Health
  7. Mammals
  8. Monkeys
  9. peer-reviewed
  10. Primates
  11. Research
  12. South America
  13. Stress
  14. Techniques
  15. training
  16. United States of America
  17. vertebrates
Badges
  1. peer-reviewed