The HABRI Foundation is calling for research proposals to investigate the health outcomes of pet ownership and/or animal-assisted activity or therapy, both for the people and the animals involved. To learn more, visit https://habri.org/grants/funding-opportunities/ close

 
You are here: Home / Journal Articles / Do you see what i see? Can non-experts with minimal training reproduce expert ratings in behavioral assessments of working dogs? / About

Do you see what i see? Can non-experts with minimal training reproduce expert ratings in behavioral assessments of working dogs?

By J. L. Fratkin, D. L. Sinn, S. Thomas, S. Hilliard, Z. Olson, S. D. Gosling

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

Working-dog organizations often use behavioral ratings by experts to evaluate a dog's likelihood of success. However, these experts are frequently under severe time constraints. One way to alleviate the pressure on limited organizational resources would be to use non-experts to assess dog behavior. Here, in populations of military working dogs (Study 1) and explosive-detection dogs (Study 2), we evaluated the reliability and validity of behavioral ratings assessed by minimally trained non-experts from videotapes. Analyses yielded evidence for generally good levels of inter-observer reliability and criterion validity (indexed by convergence between the non-expert ratings and ratings made previously by experts). We found some variation across items in Study 2 such that reliability and validity was significantly lower for three out of the 18 items, and one item had reliability and validity estimates that were impacted heavily by the behavioral test environment. There were no differences in reliability and validity based on the age of the dog. Overall the results suggest that ratings made by minimally trained non-experts for most items can serve as a viable alternative to expert ratings freeing limited resources of highly trained staff.

Publication Title Behavioural Processes
Volume 110
Pages 105-116
ISBN/ISSN 0376-6357
Publisher Elsevier
DOI 10.1016/j.beproc.2014.09.028
Language English
Author Address Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at Austin, 108 E. Dean Keeton Stop A8000, Austin, TX 78712, USA.fratkijl@utexas.edu fratkijl@gmail.com
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. Age
  2. Agencies and organizations
  3. Animal behavior
  4. Animals
  5. Assessment
  6. Canidae
  7. Canine
  8. Carnivores
  9. Constraints
  10. Dogs
  11. Experts
  12. Mammals
  13. peer-reviewed
  14. Pets and companion animals
  15. reliability
  16. training of animals
  17. vertebrates
  18. Working animals
Badges
  1. peer-reviewed