You are here: Home / Journal Articles / The Influence of Pet Gender and Instructors' Gender on Students' Perception of Comfort and Approachability to Pet-Owning Professors / About

The Influence of Pet Gender and Instructors' Gender on Students' Perception of Comfort and Approachability to Pet-Owning Professors

By Douglas James Anastasia

View Link (HTM)

Licensed under

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

College students may psychologically benefit from the presence of a pet dog in a professor's office, while instructors may be perceived as more approachable to their student body simply by having their pet dog present. Research indicates that people are sometimes perceived more positively simply by the accompaniment of a pet dog. While past research has found differences among students ' perceptions of approachability to pet owners with different pet animals, the present study will examine the effects of a dog's gender, along with the gender of a college instructor on college students' perceptions of the dog owning instructor. Participants included 136 college students from a small New England state college. Participants were randomly assigned to read a scenario and view two pictures: an instructor and a dog. Gender of professor was evident in the photograph, but gender of the dog was referenced in the corresponding written scenario. After viewing the photographs and reading a brief written scenario, participants then responded to a questionnaire. Results indicated that dog gender and instructor gender did not influence college students' perceptions of comfort and approachability toward faculty members.

Submitter

Katie Carroll

Date 2005
Publication Title FSU Journal of Behavioral Sciences
Volume 9
Issue 1
Publisher Framingham State University
URL http://digitalcommons.framingham.edu/journal_of_behavioral_sciences/vol9/iss1/6/
Language English
Additional Language English
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. Animal-assisted therapies
  2. Animal roles
  3. Comfort
  4. Dogs
  5. Gender
  6. Mammals
  7. Pet ownership
  8. Pets and companion animals
  9. Schools
  10. Stress
  11. students
  12. teachers
  13. Universities and Colleges