The HABRI Central Team continues to monitor emerging research and information about the COVID-19 pandemic. Visit our collection of resources, https://habricentral.org/features/covid-19 close

 
You are here: Home / Journal Articles / Hunger in pregnant sows: effects of a fibrous diet and free access to straw / About

Hunger in pregnant sows: effects of a fibrous diet and free access to straw

By M. B. Jensen, L. J. Pedersen, P. K. Theil, K. E. B. Knudsen

View Resource (HTM)

Licensed under

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

Fibrous diets and the provision of straw have been suggested to reduce feeding motivation in pregnant sows. The present experiment investigated the separate and interactive effects of a fibrous diet and ad libitum access to straw on feeding motivation, oral behaviour and plasma levels of metabolites and hormones in pregnant sows. Ten groups of three pregnant sows were housed in pens with concrete floor where a limited amount of chopped straw (approx. 330 g/sow) was provided daily. In 5 of the 10 groups sows had free access to uncut straw in racks in addition to the chopped straw ( Ad libitum straw), while the remaining 5 groups did not ( Limited straw). The experimental period (week 2-9 of pregnancy) was divided into two 4-week periods and in a cross-over design sows within groups were fed a standard control diet (18% dietary fibre) during one period and a fibrous diet containing sugar beet pulp (35% dietary fibre) during the other period. Both diets were offered restrictively at 22 MJ net energy per day and throughout the experimental period sows were fed twice daily at 0800 and 1500 h. At the end of each 4-week period the undisturbed behaviour of the sows was recorded during two 24 h periods. Furthermore, the sows' feeding motivation was assessed during behavioural tests, and blood samples were draw via a jugular vein catheter, at 0700, 0900, 1200 and 1900 h in a balanced design. Feeding motivation was not affected by diet or straw. However, feeding motivation was highest 1 h before morning feeding indicated by a higher number of rewards earned during the entire test ( P

Publication Title Applied Animal Behaviour Science
Volume 171
Pages 81-87
ISBN/ISSN 0168-1591
DOI 10.1016/j.applanim.2015.08.011
Language English
Author Address Department of Animal Science, Aarhus University, Blichers Alle 20, DK-8830 Tjele, Denmark.MargitBak.Jensen@anis.au.dk
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. Adverse effects
  2. Angiosperms
  3. Animal behavior
  4. Animal nutrition
  5. Animals
  6. Blood
  7. Diets
  8. Effect
  9. Fatty acids
  10. Feeding
  11. Fiber
  12. Flowers
  13. Hormones
  14. Hunger
  15. Mammals
  16. Metabolites
  17. peer-reviewed
  18. pens
  19. Pigs
  20. Plants
  21. pregnancy
  22. sows
  23. Straw
  24. Suiformes
  25. ungulates
  26. vegetables
  27. veins
  28. vertebrates
Badges
  1. peer-reviewed